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June 2010 Town Reports 



2010 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
2010 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 




About the Cover: 

For a small town, Lincoln regularly juggles many significant projects at once. 
2010 was no exception... 

Counter clockwise from upper right: The MacDowell land purchase preserved 
woods, fields and beautiful boardwalks like this; The multi-board 4 th of July 
float symbolized a new spirit of collaboration amongst boards and 
committees; John Snell receives Lincoln's $140,000 Green Community grant 
check; Architectural drawings developed by the Town Offices Study 
Committee; and a watercolor of the Town Office building, hanging in the 
Donaldson room, depicts the building at the heart of our volunteer 
government. 



'Cover art and narrative provided by Noah Eckhouse. 






REPORT 

of the 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 2010 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

TOWN INFORMATION 5 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 7 

Officers and Committees 16 

Town Clerk 25 

Vital Records 27 

Annual Town Meeting 28 

Annual Town Election 51 

State Primary Election 52 

State Election 53 

Personnel Board 54 

FINANCE 

Finance Director/Town Accountant 55 

Collector 56 

Treasurer 57 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 64 

Board of Assessors 66 

Capital Planning Committee 68 

Community Preservation Committee 70 

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 72 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Police Department 73 

Fire Department 75 

Building Department 78 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 79 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Board of Health 80 

Animal Census 81 

Dog Officer 82 

Council on Aging 83 

Commission on Disabilities 85 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Public Works and Highway Department 87 

Cemetery Commission i 89 

Water Commission 90 



PLANNING, ZONING, AND CONSERVATION 

Planning Board 92 

Zoning Board of Appeals 95 
Historic District Commission and Lincoln Historic Commission 97 

Housing Commission 99 

Conservation Commission 101 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 103 

Agriculture Commission 106 

Green Energy Technology Committee 108 

LIBRARY, RECREATION, AND SCHOOLS 

Lincoln Public Library Trustees 1 1 

Recreation Committee 112 

Pierce Property Committee 1 14 

Cultural Council 115 

Lincoln School Committee 117 

Lincoln Schools Graduates (8 th Grade) 120 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School Superintendent 122 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District 124 



First Settled 

Town Incorporated 

Town Area 

Population 

Registered Voters 

Type of Government 

2010 Annual Town Meeting 

2010 Annual Election of Officers 

FY 2010 Tax Rate 

FY 2011 Tax Rate 



TOWN INFORMATION 

1650-1680 



1754 




14.56 square miles 


6,041 (including Hanscom AFB) 


4,427 (including Hanscom AFB) 


Town Meeting 




March 27, 2010 




March 29, 2010 




Residential 
Commercial 


$11.47 
$15.09 


Residential 
Commercial 


$12.37 
$16.27 



DEPARTMENT 

TOWN OFFICES 

16 Lincoln Road 



MUNICIPAL AND SCHOOL OFFICES 
OFFICE HOURS 

Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM 
Unless otherwise specified: 



Accounting & Finance 

Administration 

Assessors 

Building Inspector 

Collector/Treasurer 

Conservation 

Health, Board of 

Housing Commission 

Historical Commission 
& Historic District Comm. 



PHONE 



259-2608 
259-2600 
259-2611 
259-2613 
259-2605 
259-2612 
259-2614 
259-2614 
259-2614 



Planning 



259-2610 



Selectmen, Board of 259-2600 

Town Clerk 259-2607 

Zoning Board of Appeals Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs 259-2610 

9AM - 2PM 

COUNCIL ON AGING Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM 259- 881 1 

Bemis Hall 
1 5 Bedford Road 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

169 Lincoln Road 

Emergencies 911 

General Business 259-8113 

PUBLIC WORKS 

30 Lewis Street Mon-Fri 7:00 AM - 3:30 PM 259-8999 

Transfer Station Wed & Sat 9:30 AM - 3:30 PM 259-8999 

Route 2A 



WATER DEPARTMENT Mon- Fri. 700 AM - 3:30 PM 

Pumping Station, 77 Sandy Pond Road 259-8997 

Filtration Plant, 80 Sandy Pond Road (manned daily) 259-1329 

RECREATION 259-0784 
Ballfield Road, Hartwell Building 

LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 259-9400 
Ballfield Road 

Smith School (K - 4) 259-9404 

Brooks School (5 - 8) 259-9408 

Superintendent 259-9409 

Business Office 259-9401 

LINCOLN SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL 978-443-9961 

390 Lincoln Road, Sudbury 

HANSCOM SCHOOLS - Hanscom AFB 

Hanscom Primary 274-7722 

Hanscom Middle 274-7720 

MINUTEMAN REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 861-6500 
758 Marrett Road, Lexington 



PUBLIC MEETINGS ARE POSTED ON THE TOWN OFFICES BULLETIN BOARD AND 
ON THE TOWN MUNICIPAL CALENDAR @ www.lincolntown.org . 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

D. Noah Eckhouse 
Sara A. Mattes 
Gary A. Taylor 

Timothy Higgins, Town Administrator 

Anita Scheipers, Assistant Town Administrator 

Debra Parkhurst, Administrative Assistant 

Introduction 

"May you live in interesting times," the reputed Chinese blessing and curse, 
seems apt for Lincoln's current circumstances. Like governmental agencies of all 
sorts we are squeezed financially by rising costs on the one hand and the 
impacts of the lingering economic downturn on the other. In addition we face 
substantial outlays to refurbish and renew aged infrastructure at Town Offices 
and the Lincoln Schools and to provide suitable facilities for our Council on 
Aging. Concerns have arisen regarding the funding of Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
High School and the leasing of housing at Hanscom Air Force Base to families 
unconnected to the military, prompting sober reflection regarding longstanding 
relationships with L-S and the Hanscom schools and how best to assure quality 
education for Lincoln students. We shall not lack for things to do! 

Despite myriad challenges, we continue to fare well on many fronts. Hard work 
and good fortune have shored up Lincoln's fiscal situation. Completion of the 
first stage of The Groves provided a boost to commercial tax revenues while the 
re-sourcing of health insurance coverage for town employees along with 
redistribution of our pension obligations yielded very substantial cost savings 
both immediately and for the future. Important infrastructure efforts are 
progressing. We completed Phase I of our roadway rehabilitation project, and 
Phase II should be completed this coming summer. Similarly, a major hurdle for 
the Rte. 2 project at Crosby's Corner has now been cleared, and the project 
seems finally on the last lap toward construction. The renovation of Lincoln 
Station, the opening of AKA Bistro, the expansion and upgrading of Donelan's 
Supermarket and the restructuring of Lincoln Woods have rejuvenated and, 
hopefully, re-anchored Lincoln's retail center. Coming attractions including 
roadway and walkway improvements in the area and a new wine and cheese 
shop will provide additional interest and better access. Conservation efforts have 
also met with success. An outstanding cooperative effort by the Rural Land 
Foundation, Mass Audubon, the town and private contributors acquired the 21 
acre MacDowell property, placed it along with 56 adjoining acres under 



permanent agricultural restrictions, and provided a conservation easement and a 
new wooden walkway connecting to conservation land in Weston. We are also 
making good, but less visible progress in providing needed services more 
efficiently and we continue to expand our participation in regional activities to 
promote Lincoln's interests. 

So, as we face challenges ahead, Lincoln continues to navigate troubled waters, 
making steady headway avoiding major upsets. This could not happen without 
the efforts of many dedicated volunteers and the support of a capable and 
effective town staff. 

Town Finances 

In response to a sharper than expected drop in state aid and slower than 
expected revenue growth associated with the Groves assisted living project, we 
thought it prudent to call a special town meeting to rebalance the FY 10 budget. 
The shortfall was addressed by rescinding funds for various equipment 
purchases that had been previously approved, by lowering the general insurance 
budget (premiums were lower than projected), by taking advantage of one-time 
school revenues and by making a modest transfer from the town's reserves. We 
ended FY 10 with a balanced budget and began FY 11 in a solid financial 
position. 

Our overall financial situation has improved this year despite a projected decline 
in state aid for the coming fiscal year. The Groves development, the delay of 
which reduced revenues and required adjustment of the FY 10 budget, has now 
moved to completion of its initial phase. This has yielded additional funds 
through increased permitting fees and new construction revenues, and will 
provide a continuing source of tax revenue for the future. We have also had 
success in reducing our insurance and pension expenditures. Recently we were 
able to change health insurance providers in a manner that yielded significant 
reductions in premiums to both the Town and its employees and also pared and 
simplified the administrative burden upon our staff. With the cooperation of our 
union bargaining units, for which we are grateful, implementation went very 
quickly so that we not only gained long-term benefits, but were also able to 
capture savings almost immediately. In response to recent market events, the 
Commonwealth reduced the rate at which public pension programs must be 
funded, thus lowering our annual assessments from the Middlesex County 
Pension program that covers our employees. All of these developments are 
beneficial both now and in the future. 

We have also made progress in lowering costs while maintaining or even 
improving services. Lincoln was instrumental in the organization of a new 
regional entity to provide Advanced Life Support services to ten area 
municipalities. This service, which covers high-level services not offered by our 
own Public Safety Department, was previously offered by Emerson Hospital. 

8 



The new ALS service has been in operation successfully now for several months, 
and received a regional commendation for its outstanding service. One of its two 
emergency vehicles and its associated staff is housed here in Lincoln, assuring 
minimal response for Lincoln citizens in times of need. Even with improved 
service, this new approach offers reductions in cost. The Town continues to look 
for cost savings in other ways. We are currently using a part-time building 
inspector to replace our recently retired full-time inspector, and are proposing the 
sharing of facilities management services by the Town, Schools and Library. Our 
housing agencies are participating in a trial effort to regionalize the administration 
of affordable housing. We are also investigating the possible regionalization of 
Public Safety dispatchers. Meetings among the land use boards have resulted in 
an agreement among the agencies that will improve coordination and resource 
use. Chris Reilly has joined us as the Director of Planning and Land Use 
Permitting to oversee the planning process, to facilitate the activities of the 
permitting and land use agencies and to bolster Lincoln's participation in regional 
efforts. 

Such good news on the operating budgets is very welcome right now because 
we anticipate that needed capital expenditures to upgrade our outdated town and 
school facilities, as detailed later, will put pressure on tax bills in coming years. 
The Capital Planning Committee has expanded its role to insure that larger 
projects, such as facilities upgrades, are not only thoroughly vetted but are also 
coordinated and managed in order to minimize impacts upon Lincoln's taxpayers. 
The Finance Committee, Finance Director and Town Administrator have 
developed a forecast model to allow us to assess the tax impact of the various 
projects that are under consideration. We will continue to make this information 
a focal point of our discussion of capital needs with the town. 

Infrastructure Projects 

Roadway Rehabilitation 

In March of 2008 the Town Meeting authorized the Selectmen to borrow up to 
$5.5 million to rehabilitate the town's primary roadways. The project was 
separated into two phases. Phase I, consisting of Route 126, Trapelo Road, 
Baker Bridge, Sandy Pond Road (between Bedford Road and Baker Bridge 
Road) and Bedford Road (north of Route 2) is now complete. We recently 
completed the design and updated cost estimates for Phase II, which will consist 
of Bedford Road (between Route 2 and Lincoln Road), Lincoln Road (from 
Bedford Road to Route 117) and Route 117. Bids have just been opened, and 
the guidance of Superintendent Bibbo in a bidding strategy proved wise as we 
came in lower than originally anticipated. Barring unforeseen circumstances the 
Phase II contract can be awarded in time for construction to begin this April. 

While based upon initial cost estimates, anticipated funding was insufficient to 
complete the entire scope of work originally contemplated for the overall 

9 



rehabilitation project. As a result, we evaluated the condition of each road by 
segment and elected to hold out several segments as lower priorities and did not 
include them in the base bid we requested from contractors. However, the 
recently received bids were sufficiently low to allow us to re-examine how much 
of the overall project can now be completed. We have built a balance in our 
state roadway (Chapter 90) account, which combined with the remaining bond 
funds, should allow us to complete the renovation of the major roads and still 
leave us with the resources to proceed with much needed improvements on 
Lincoln's secondary roads. 

In addition, the Roadway and Traffic Committee (RTC) has recommended that 
we undertake a feasibility study to evaluate redesigning the intersections at 
Route 117/Lincoln Road and Route 126/Route 117 - both locations where the 
frequency and severity of accidents is of concern. We have taken this 
recommendation under advisement and are considering whether or not to move 
forward with it at this time. 

Town Offices 

Town Offices is home to the town's executive, administrative, land use and 
permitting, and financial offices and activities. It is also the volunteer heart of our 
community - it hosts the majority of meetings that are integral to the operation of 
the boards, committees and commissions that constitute our municipal 
government - both ordinary meetings for the conduct of the town's business as 
well as special hearings, meetings and events. The building has served the town 
well. Initially constructed in 1908 as the Center School, the building functioned 
as a school building until the 1980s when it was converted for use as town 
offices. It has since then received only very modest repairs and updates. It has 
served well beyond its planned useful life, is sorely out of compliance with 
modern access and safety requirements, has outdated and failing core systems 
and is badly in need of renovation. 

Two separate evaluations have concluded that the building is in need of code 
compliance upgrades, mechanical system upgrades and other improvements to 
allow its continued use as offices and meeting space for provision of our town 
services. We received funding last March to prepare a formal feasibility study. 
We've appointed a committee, the Town Offices Study Committee (TOSC) to 
oversee the effort. The consulting firm of Bargmann Hendrie + Archetype (BH + 
A) of Boston has been hired to provide state-mandated project management 
services. The firm of McGinley Kalsow and Associates (MK&A) of Somerville is 
providing architectural services. Both firms are highly experienced in the 
renovation of historic town halls. 

As part of the appropriation of the FY11 CPC funds, TOSC was asked to 
ascertain what options existed as alternate locations for town offices, and to 
determine if the existing building truly is the best site for our town hall. After 

10 



reviewing all options, TOSC came to the unanimous conclusion that the current 
town offices location is the best site for town offices due to its central location, its 
historic presence, and its apparent ability to allow all current and programmatic 
needs of the town offices in the foreseeable future. TOSC is currently working 
with the architectural team and with stakeholder groups including volunteer board 
members and town staff to develop schematic (15% design) plans for the 
renovation of the building. 

TOSC has approached this task with the appropriate balance of short term and 
long term thinking. With a planned-for horizon of 30-50 years before the building 
needs additional refurbishment, significant questions come to mind... How much 
storage space should be allotted to paper records? When will the state allow for 
use of electronic forms of document storage? Will all bills be paid electronically? 
What will the staffing levels of town government be in 20 years? How will 
headcount be reallocated? What is the next "green" technology we'll want to 
incorporate in the building? 

The plan TOSC developed strives to balance accessibility, historic preservation, 
flexibility and sustainability in thoughtful yet fiscally restrained way. By better 
using available space in the existing building footprint, TOSC feels that 
significant, complex and costly additions can be avoided. The focus has been on 
utilizing the strong "bones" of the building and reshaping it for the 21st century 
with a full interior rehabilitation. 

On the basis of these plans TOSC will propose that the Town Meeting in March 
201 1 appropriate funds to cover all remaining project costs, which include the 
completion of the design, creation of bid documents, and the actual construction 
- as well as associated costs such as temporary relocation of the town offices 
during the construction phase. At this stage, TOSC estimates the base project 
cost at $6,500,000 to $6,800,000. An alternative design with additional, 
desirable features requiring a larger expenditure may also be presented. Should 
town meeting approve the funds, and associated borrowing, the detailed design 
process would begin in the spring of 2011, with bid ready documents expected 
by early fall and the project to begin before the end of the calendar year 2011 
Construction will likely to take twelve to eighteen months to complete. 

Lincoln School Facilities 

The effort to develop a school facilities renovation project is discussed in detail in 
the report of the Lincoln Schools. The BOS is participating on the School 
Building Committee which has selected the required Owner's Project Manager 
and has recently worked with the Massachusetts School Building Assistance 
(MSBA) program to identify and select an architectural firm to assist in the design 
and construction of the project. The schedule for the project contemplates a very 
intensive period of public participation in the design effort that will occur early in 
the Spring of 2011, immediately following Town Meeting with a preferred option 

11 



presented to MSBA in June, 2011. If approved by MSBA, a proposal for 
remaining design and construction costs would be made at Town Meeting in 
March of 2012. With approval of Town Meeting and of Lincoln voters in a 
municipal election, construction could commence in the fall of 2012 or spring of 
2013 and would take 2 to 3 years to complete. 

Right now the costs of the school project are quite speculative, but they generally 
range from $25 to $40 million with an expected contribution from MSBA of from 
35% to 40%. This yields a low estimate of $15 million and a high estimate of 
approximately $26 million for Lincoln's ultimate cost. 

Tax Planning 

The coincidence of the town offices and school projects, driven by the timetable 
dictated by the MSBA to qualify for the substantial funding (35 to 40% of 
approved project costs), obviously presents a financial challenge. In order to 
manage this challenge the Capital Planning Committee has undertaken to 
assess alternative approaches and to recommend a strategy for raising the funds 
required that minimizes and fairly allocates the resulting tax burden. They are 
working with the Finance Committee, the Town Administrator and Finance 
Director to forecast tax impacts of various timing options and use of financial 
management tools that have recently been made available to municipalities in 
the Commonwealth. These tools include more flexible principal payments, 
alteration of principal payment approaches over life of a bond and extended 
bonding periods. The Town is also investigating options for use of CPC 
(Community Preservation) funds both to lower the amount that will have to be 
bonded and to cushion the impacts of potential peaks on debt service over time. 
Both the immediate impacts and long-term consequences of proposed capital 
expenditures for Lincoln's taxpayers will be discussed in detail before approval is 
requested. The Capital Planning Committee is also developing a 20 year 
schedule of maintenance and capital needs for all major town and school 
facilities so that the replacement process can be managed effectively in the 
future. 

School Relationships 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

As we reported last year and discussed at the recent State of the Town Meeting, 
changes in demographics have altered our relationship with Sudbury and our 
regional high school. Most residents are aware that Sudbury has grown much 
faster than Lincoln and that, as a consequence, our students now comprise only 
about one sixth of the students at L-S. What is less appreciated is that Sudbury 
has a higher percentage of households with children in public schools than any 
other municipality in the Commonwealth. This makes education a particularly 
heavy burden upon taxpayers regardless of whether or not they have children in 

12 



the public schools. As a result, Sudbury is facing a very difficult fiscal challenge 
that may take many years to address. 

One consequence of the fiscal situation is downward pressure on school 
budgets. Sudbury's K-8 system is funded below the state average and well 
below L-S on a per student basis, thus arguing for redirection of resources away 
from L-S to the Sudbury elementary schools. Since the budget at L-S is 
constrained by the lowest level supported by either of the towns, the financial 
position of the regional high school is likely to suffer regardless of what Lincoln 
might be willing to contribute. Some citizens in Sudbury have been vocal in 
seeking consolidation of the L-S and Sudbury K-8 systems in order to cut costs. 
Any changes in the Regional Agreement require support from both towns, and 
while there is no proposal currently on the table, pressure from Sudbury for such 
measures will likely continue unless and until Sudbury's budget situation 
improves substantially. 

Discussion at the recent State of the Town Meeting indicated that Lincoln citizens 
are very concerned about circumstances at L-S and interested in investigating 
what Lincoln might do to assure quality education for its high school aged 
children in the future. In response, the Selectmen have begun a process to 
establish quality criteria, to address specific concerns about L-S or, barring this, 
to assess alternatives to L-S. Two groups have been organized; one to collect 
objective data for assessment of conditions and trends, the other to develop 
criteria Lincoln residents would like to see used in judging educational options. 
The next phase would involve assessing ways to assure quality education at L-S 
and options to L-S for meeting the needs of Lincoln's high school students. The 
Selectmen will remain engaged along with Sudbury town officials and the L-S 
and K-8 school committees in dealing with this potentially contentious issue. 

Hanscom Schools 

We have in the past reported that the federal government contracted with a 
private developer to revitalize and reconstruct the housing units for military 
personnel on Hanscom Air Force Base. We wholeheartedly support efforts to 
improve the living conditions for our military's families. However, under its 
agreement with the Department of Defense, the private developer is permitted to 
lease to non-military families if the number of interested military families is 
insufficient to fill the new housing. This raises a number of complex legal 
questions as to responsibilities for providing town and school services and who 
pays for them. We have attempted to negotiate a voluntary payment in lieu of 
taxes agreement with the developer. The developer has thus far refused to enter 
into such an agreement. 

We continue to explore the legal and political options available to ensure that 
Lincoln taxpayers are not forced to bear the costs of providing educational 
services to non-military individuals permitted to occupy base housing solely to 

13 



improve the economics for a for-profit developer. When the Base housing 
program is complete, there will be 700 or more housing units located within 
Lincoln on the Base, all with 3 or 4 bedrooms. The Base estimates that it will 
need approximately 500 units to meet the needs of military families, leaving 200 
to 250 units that the developer could lease to non-military families. The Town is 
fully reimbursed for the cost of educating military families under our current 
contract. However, DoD is not authorized to reimburse us for the children of non- 
military families. We have currently enrolled a few students from non-military 
families in Hanscom housing on an interim basis until the situation can be sorted 
out. 

The inequity of Lincoln bearing the costs of educating students from households 
exempt from taxation are obvious and compelling; however, this may be the case 
if a solution is not found. The consequences could be quite severe, so we shall 
continue diligently to reach some sort of accommodation over the coming year. 
Ultimately there may be no recourse except through litigation, an outcome we 
fervently hope to avoid. 



Regional Activities 

Lincoln continues to play an active role in regional efforts and organizations such 
as HATS, MAGIC, Battle Road Scenic Byway and the 128 Central Corridor 
Coalition (128 3C). These activities improve Lincoln's understanding of regional 
issues and increase our influence. We are better equipped to collaborate with 
our neighbors and acquire resources for regional planning efforts. 

Our participation in HATS is critical in maintaining a good working relationship 
with Hanscom Air Force Base and in providing some degree of monitoring of 
Massport's L.G. Hanscom Civil Airport expansion efforts. HATS also provides 
opportunities for the four member towns (Lincoln, Bedford, Concord and 
Lexington) to share information and develop new ideas for regional collaboration. 

MAGIC is an arena similar to HATS, but on a much larger scale and a much 
broader planning focus. MAGIC also offers information about opportunities for 
regional collaboration. MAGIC is particularly important to Lincoln since it is a 
critical agent in voting to recommend distribution of Federal Highway Funds 
necessary to complete long-delayed improvements at Crosby's Corner on Route 
2. 

The Battle Road Scenic Byway: Road to Revolutions (BRSB) has provided an 
opportunity to collaborate over planning along our northern border in 
collaboration with Minute Man National Historical Park and the towns of 
Arlington, Lexington, and Concord. It has enhanced awareness of and 
commitment to stewardship for the unique sites and vistas that are cherished by 
Lincoln. 



14 



The 128 Central Corridor Coalition (128 3C) is made up of the towns of Weston, 
Lincoln, Lexington and Burlington, and the City of Waltham, in partnership with 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC). It is near completion of a plan that 
lays out the challenges for sustainable economic development along Route 128 
and includes recommendations for short, mid- and long-term action to ensure 
sustainability while seeking creative ways to reduce traffic congestion. 

In Conclusion 

Indeed, we "live in interesting times." The Board of Selectman and Town staff 
are working hard and thinking deeply on the issues discussed herein, mindful 
that Lincoln's thoughtful, creative and yet conservative approach to managing 
change in the past has helped ease us gently into the new decade. We 
encourage you to join us in the conversation about Lincoln's future. Our Town 
only becomes stronger with a broader, deeper base of participation from town 
residents. Thanks to our staff led by Tim Higgins and Anita Scheipers for their 
wise, able and energetic support and their dedication to Lincoln. 



15 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR 



ELECTED 



John B. French 

TOWN CLERK 
Susan Brooks 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Noah Eckhouse 
Sara Mattes 
Gerald Taylor 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Ellen Meadors 
Edward Morgan 
John G. Robinson 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Timothy Christenfeld 

Jennifer Glass 

Jen James (interim appointment) 

Tom Sander 

Alvin L. Schmertzler 

WATER COMMISSION 
Despena Billings 
Andrew Cole 
Paul Giese 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
Frederick L. Mansfield 
Diane Haessler 
Arnold N. Weinberg 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 
Manley Boyce 
Susan S. Harding 
Alexander (Jack) Pugh 



Term Expires 

2011 



2013 



2013 
2012 
2011 



2011 
2012 
2013 



2013 
2011 
2011 
2013 
2012 



2011 
2012 
2013 



2011 
2012 
2013 



2011 
2012 
2013 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Mark Collins 2012 

RadhaGargeya 2013 

Nancy Marshall (Lincoln Resident) 2012 

Kevin J. Matthews 2013 

Patricia M. Mostue (Lincoln Resident) 201 1 

Berne B.Webb 2011 



16 



PLANNING BOARD 

Dan Boynton 2014 

James Craig 2013 

Robert Domnitz 2015 

Kenneth Hurd 2012 

BryceWolf 2011 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Donald Collins 2012 

Douglas Harding 2013 

Peter Hodges 2011 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 

Susan Conway Pease 2012 

Andrew Singer 2011 

Gertrude M. Webb 2013 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Diana Abrashkin (Library Trustees Appointee) 

Jacquelin Apsler (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 201 1 

Marshall Clemens (School Committee Appointee) acting 

Jean Home (Library Trustees Appointee) 

Peter Sugar (Library Trustees Appointee) 

Susan H. Taylor (Elected) 201 3 

DECORDOVA MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE PARK TRUSTEES 

Scarlett H. Carey (Elected) 201 1 

Jamie Jaffee (Elected) 2014 

Melinda Webster Loot (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 

Melissa S. Meyer (Elected) 2012 

Stacy Osur (Elected) 201 3 

Katherine Hall Page (School Committee Appointee) 

Peter Sugar (Library Trustees Appointee) 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

Ragnhild Fredriksen (Elected) 2013 

Pamela Gallup (Elected) 201 1 

George Georges (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 2014 

Constance Lewis (Elected) 2012 
Phyllis Mutschler (State Appointee) 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Susan Collins (Elected) 2013 

Jonathan Dwyer (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 201 3 

Chris Fasciano (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 2012 

Edward A. Julian (Elected) 2012 

Ingrid Neri (Elected) 2011 

Jane Tatlock (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 201 1 



17 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 
Timothy Higgins 

ASSISTANT TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 
Anita Scheipers 

ACCOUNTANT/FINANCE DIRECTOR 
Colleen Wilkins 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Mary Day 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Joel Bard 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Christian Bibbo 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER DEPARTMENT 

Gregory Woods 

FIRE CHIEF 
Arthur Cotoni 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Kevin Mooney 

POLICE LIEUTENANT 
Kevin Kennedy 

POLICE SERGEANT 
Sean Kennedy 
Richard McCarty 
Paul Westlund 

POLICE DETECTIVE 
Jon Wentworth 

POLICE OFFICERS 
William Carlo 
Robert Gallo 
Thomas Moran 
David Regan 
Ian Spencer 
Laura Stewart 
Robert Surette 

CONSTABLES 

Barbara Hartnett 2010 

Robert Paul Millian 2011 

Kevin Mooney 2010 



18 



DOG OFFICER 
Leslie Boardman 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
Courtney Atkinson 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Earl Midgley 

WIRING INSPECTOR 
Robert Norton 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Russell Dixon 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 
Thomas Moran 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 
Elaine Carroll 

VETERANS' SERVICES OFFICER 

Priscilla Leach 2011 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE 

Robert Sutherland (Council on Aging) 2012 

TREE WARDEN 

Kenneth Bassett 201 1 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret Martin 201 1 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Susan Brooks, Ex Officio (Town Clerk) 

Peggy Elliott acting 

Marshall Sandock acting 

Jacquelyn Snelling acting 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

James Henderson 2013 

Joyce Hersh 2011 

Benjamin Home 2012 

Ah Kurtz 2012 

Sara Lewis 2011 

James Meadors 2013 

Peter Von Mertens 20 1 3 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Steve Daigle 2014 

Joel Freedman 201 1 

David Henken, Associate 2012 

John Kimball 2013 

Jefferson Macklin 2012 



19 



Margaret Olson, Associate 


2013 


Megan Stride 


2015 


David Summer, Associate 


2011 


COUNCIL ON AGING 




Margaret Boyer 


2011 


Florence Caras 


2012 


John Caswell 


2011 


Eugene C. Cooper 


2013 


Benjamin Home 


2011 


Valerie Lee 


2012 


Don Milan 


2012 


Julie Pugh 


2011 


Mary Sheldon 


2012 


Robert Sutherland 


2013 


Dorothy Taylor 


2013 


Barbara Terrano 


2013 


DISABILITIES COMMISSION 




Deborah Dorsey 


2013 


John Ritz 


2012 


Anita Scheipers, Ex Officio (Assistant Town Administrator) 




Jim Spindler 


2013 


Robert Stuart-Vail 


2012 


LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 




Lucretia Giese 


2013 


Kerry Glass 


2011 


Andrew Glass, Alternate 


2012 


Henry Hoover, Jr., Alternate 


2012 


Andrew Ory 


2013 


Colin Smith 


2012 


Ruth Wales 


2011 


Laurence Zeulke, Alternate 


2012 


HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 




Douglas Adams, Alternate 


2013 


James Craig (Planning Board) 


2012 


Lucretia Giese (Architect) 


2011 


Kerry Glass (Historical Society) 


2011 


Kenneth Hurd (Planning Board) 


2010 


Andrew Ory (Real Estate Agent) 


2013 


Colin Smith (Historic District Resident) 


2012 


Ruth Wales 


2011 


LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL 




Amy Goodwin 


2013 


Barbara Low 


2013 


Lisa Putukian 


2013 


Joanie Schaffner 


2011 


Susan Welsh 


2011 



20 



PIERCE HOUSE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Judy Gross 2012 

Jean Home 2013 

Lucia MacMahon 2011 

Max Mason 2011 

Walter Salmon 2012 

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE FUND COMMITTEE 

Carolyn Bottum, Ex Officio (COA Director) 

Timothy Higgins, Ex Officio (Selectmen Representative) 

Julie Pugh (First Parish Church) 2013 

Nancy Ritchie (St. Anne's Church) 201 1 

Mary Sheldon (Council on Aging) 201 1 

Jane Thomas (St. Julia's Parish) 201 3 

GREEN ENERGY TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE 

Laura Berland 2011 

Barbara Buchan 2011 

Elizabeth Cherniak 2011 

Linda Conrad 2011 

Marcus Gleysteen 2011 
Timothy Higgins, Ex Officio (Town Administrator) 

Edmund Lang 2011 

Jennifer Morris 2011 

Alvin L. Schmertzler 2011 

JohnSnell 2011 

Peter Watkinson 2011 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
James Cunningham 

AGRICULTURAL COMMISSION 

Nancy Bergen 2013 

Lynn Bower 2011 

KitCarmody 2012 

Christy Foote-Smith 2012 

Jen James 2011 

KipKumler 2011 

Ah Kurtz 2012 

Timothy Laird 2013 

Margaret Marsh 201 1 

Ellen Raja 2013 

Beth Taylor 2013 

HANSCOM FIELD ADVISORY COMMISSION (HFAC) 

Sara Mattes 2012 

HANSCOM AREA TOWNS STUDY COMMITTEE (HATS) 

Sara Mattes (Board of Selectmen) 201 1 

MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

Sara Mattes 2011 



21 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL (MAPC) 

William Constable 2011 

SUASCO WILD AND SCENIC RIVER STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL 

James Henderson, Alternate 201 1 

James Meadors 2011 

AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST 

Pamela Gallup (Housing Commission) 201 1 

Betty-Jane Scheff (Board of Selectmen) 201 1 

Ellen Shorb (Finance Committee) 201 1 

Gerald Taylor 2011 

Peter Von Mertens (Lincoln Foundation) 201 1 

TOWN OFFICES STUDY COMMITTEE 

Susan Brooks (Town Clerk) 

Ed Lang (Green Energy Tech Committee) 

Brooks Mostue ( At-Large) 

Patti Salem (At-Large) 

Anita Scheipers (Asst. Town Administrator ., Ex-Officio) 

Colin Smith (Historic District Commission) 

Jim Spindler (Commission on Disabilities) 

Noah Eckhouse (Town Administrator, Board of Selectmen) 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 

ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 
Patricia Arseneault 
Lindsay Clemens 

ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK FOR THE TOWN ARCHIVES 
Barbara Myles 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

BURIAL AGENT 

Susan Brooks 2010 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Leslie Boardman 2010 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Walter Jabs 2012 

BethRies 2011 

Graham Walker 2010 



22 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Peter Braun 2010 

KarlGeiger 2010 

Eric Harris 2013 

Sanj Kharbanda 2012 

JohnKoenig 2011 

Laura Sander 2010 

CAPITAL PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Jacquelin Apsler (Library Trustee) 

Andrew Beard 

James Henderson (Conservation Commission) 

Sandra Lee Hessler (School Committee) 

Robert Jevon 

Patrick Phillips (Finance Committee) 

Anita Scheipers, Ex Officio (Assistant Town Administrator) 

Gerald Taylor (Board of Selectmen) 

MINUTEMAN CAREER & TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Kemon Taschioglou 2010 



APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 

Chris Hamilton 2013 

MarkHochman 2013 

Lewis Lloyd 2013 

Peter Sugar 2013 

LINCOLN STATION PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Bassett 2013 

Andrew Cole (Water Commission) 2013 

Ragnhild Fredriksen (Housing Commission) 2013 

Kenneth Hurd (Planning Board) 2013 

John Koenig (Finance Committee) 2013 

Sara Mattes (Board of Selectmen) 2013 

David O'Neil 2013 

Jonathan Soo 2013 

Peter Von Mertens (Conservation Commission) 2013 

Bryce Wolf, Alternate (Planning Board) 201 3 



23 



APPOINTED BY VARIOUS BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



COMMUNITY PRESERVATION COMMITTEE 

Craig Donaldson (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 2012 

Chris Fasciano (Recreation Committee Appointee) 2012 

Ragnhild Fredriksen (Housing Commission Appointee) 2010 

Lucretia Giese (Historical Commission Appointee) 

William Stason (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 2013 

John Valpey (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 201 3 

Peter Von Mertens (Conservation Commission Appointee) 201 1 

Bryce Wolf (Planning Board Appointee) 201 1 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

Sarah Bishop (Moderator Appointee) acting 

Nancy Marshall (Board of Selectmen Appointee) 2010 

Margaret Ramsey McCluskey (School Committee Appointee) 201 1 



HEALTHY COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE 

Jacqueline Apsler, Resident, Co-Chair 

Carolyn Bottum, Director: Council on Aging 

Trish McGean, Resident, RN 

Barbara Myles, Director: Lincoln Public Library 

Roger Paine, Minister, First Parish Church 

Maureen Richichi, RN, Lincoln Public Schools 

Dan Pereira, Director: Recreation Department, Co-Chair 

John Ritz, Resident, Member of Commission on Disabilities 

Anita Scheipers, Asst. Town Administrator 



24 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 

Susan F. Brooks, Town Clerk 

Patricia Arseneault, Assistant Town Clerk 

Lindsay Clemens, Assistant Town Clerk 



The Town Clerk's Office is the portal for information about town government 
affairs for both residents and local, state and federal officials. The Office serves 
as the "real time" historian of certain milestone private events (vital records) and 
municipal actions (Town Meeting appropriations, by-laws, land use decisions); it 
administers elections, the annual census and street listing process, and the year- 
round Voter Registration function; it licenses dogs, manages the town's Do Not 
Solicit database, issues raffle permits and business certificates; and it 
administers the town's public cemeteries and assists Lincoln families in the 
purchase of cemetery lots and the burial of their dead. 

The year 2010 has been a momentous one in the Town Clerk's Office (TCO). 
We look forward to a purposeful 201 1 . Highlights of the past year's activities and 
hopes for the next one are as follows: 

• Between December of last year and this, the TCO has administered five 
elections, two with turn-out rates approaching 70%. In each of these high 
turn-out events, absentee participation (most of which happens pre-election) 
accounted for fully one tenth of the electorate. As electronic voting, 
introduced to certain overseas voters this past November, becomes more 
commonplace, it, too, can be expected to have a significant impact on pre- 
election activity in the upcoming (2012) presidential cycle. 

• Election law and practice has been significantly amended in three of the last 
five election cycles, with the changes twice occurring on the very eve of a 
state-wide election. To stay nimble and well informed in this environment, 
the office will concentrate this year on the recruitment and training of the next 
generation of the town's election officers. 

• The jewel in the crown of the town's Records Management commitment is, of 
course, the Town Archives, a joint venture of the TCO and the Lincoln 
Library, revivified in 2007. The program's part-time Archivist has this year 
turned her attention to the work of expanding the collection's searchable 
inventory to include all of the permanent public records held at the Town Hall 
vault, making the Archives a more accessible resource for users and seekers 
of contemporary public records as well as historians. 



• 



The Office is charged with local implementation responsibility for the omnibus 
"ethics reform" package adopted by the legislature as Chapter 28 of the 
Acts of 2009. The law created significant new requirements for municipal 



25 



officers and employees in respect to the Conflict of Interest, Open Meeting, 
and Campaign and Political Finance laws. Implementation has focused, in 
this opening phase, on the roll-out of various compliance components of the 
much-anticipated OathMaster program, developing still with the generous 
and indefatigable Ellen Meadors. The program tracks office holder, contact, 
appointed or elected term, induction date, office history, ethics and public 
service compliance information for the 200+/- people who form the town's 
volunteer leadership corps at any one time as well as the town's 600 member 
paid work force. 

Working with the Cemetery Commission and the DPW to administer the 
town's four public cemeteries continues to be a far livelier endeavor than 
might be expected. Preparation of the Expansion Area at the Lexington 
Road Cemetery, featuring grading, seeding and culvert repair work, has 
continued through the fall. The Commission's employment of Gravestone 
Conservation consultants, Fanin-Lehner, to perform a town-wide cemetery 
monument preservation assessment proved prescient when a century old 
marker fell over last summer, reminding us all of the risks posed by 
unattended history. And the Commission has continued its efforts to 
rationalize and shift operating support from taxpayers to lot owners; it has 
created a part-time Cemetery Caretaker position, intended to alleviate the 
strain on limited DPW resources and bring regular cemetery maintenance 
functions in-house. We expect 201 1 to bring significant progress on all three 
of these initiatives. 

Reflecting the office's role in the management of public records, in April the 
Town Clerk accepted the Board of Selectmen's invitation to join its Town 
Offices Study Committee. The work of that committee, reported on 
elsewhere is exciting, some might even say enthralling, and on-going. 

AND, thanks to the support of the Board of Selectmen and the 2010 Annual 
Town Meeting, the office was able to hire an additional sixteen hour 
increment of support staff, starting with Interim Assistant Town Clerk 
Michelle Fredette, an experienced human resources professional whose 
help in re-envisioning the TCO's operating systems for this new century was 
invaluable, and succeeded in October by Assistant Town Clerk, Lindsay 
Clemens, whose talents and commitment will keep us steadily moving 
ahead. Keeping us all afloat during this transition, as she has for the past 
five years, is the endlessly gracious, steady and faithful First Assistant Town 
Clerk, Pat Arseneault. Treasures, all. 

Together, we will continue the work of forging "institutional memory" for the 
office, and of creating, recording and making available the documentation of 
our civic and private lives. Particularly exciting in the year ahead is the 
imminent introduction of a "virtual" vital records system, in which birth 
certificates (eventually marriage and death records as well) will be 

26 



authenticated by the birthing institution and its town clerk's office, recorded in 
the town clerk's office of the parents' community, and verified and archived 
by the state Department of Public Health - all "in the cloud," rather than 
making that long, laborious loop by US mail. 

We hope, as always, to hear from you in the months ahead, particularly as 
we move into the next phase of the IT Strategic Plan with departmental 
content control of a re-configured town web site scheduled for late this fall. 

We look forward, in short, to another challenging year, with abiding gratitude 
and respect for those named and not who've shared the load. 



VITAL STATISTICS 



As recommended by the Massachusetts Registry of Vital Records and Statistics, 
Lincoln birth, death and marriage records for 2010 will remain nameless. 

• There were a total of fifty-seven births, up from from forty-six the year 
before, with Hanscom babies outnumbering Lincoln babies, thirty-three 
to twenty-four, and girl babies edging out boy babies, twenty-nine to 
twenty-eight. 

• Twenty-two couples, including eight indigenous ones and one same sex 
pair, were granted Lincoln marriage licenses this year; three of those 
couples were united in matrimony by lay individuals of their choosing, 
certified to serve as "one day solemnizers." 

• And of the twenty-six Lincoln residents lost to death this year, the eldest 
had achieved ninety-six years of living. Information that is public record 
may be obtained in the Town Clerk's Office. 



27 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
Saturday, March 27, 2010 - 9:30 a.m. 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to order in the 
Donaldson Auditorium by the Moderator, Mr. John B. French, at 9:38 a.m. The 
Return of Service for the Warrant was read, and a quorum being present (379 
voters throughout the day), the following business was transacted: 

The Moderator opened the meeting with a review of the general procedure to be 
followed, with thanks to the schools and to the Girl Scouts. He called attention to 
ARTICLE 1 of the Warrant (Election of Officers and five ballot questions, which 
he briefly recapped), which will be acted upon on Monday, March 29, 2010, at 
the Smith School Gym, with the polls open from 7:30 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. 

ARTICLE 2 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That Julie Dobrow, Jack Ryan and Andy Hall be elected Fence Viewers, and 
that Sarah Cannon Holden and Robert Steinbrook be elected Measurers of 
Wood and Bark, for the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3 Proposed by the Selectmen 

After recognition is accorded, by way of applause, for State Representative 
Tom Conroy, who is in attendance, it is 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, Commissioners and 
Trustees, as printed in the annual Town Report, be accepted. 

Having arrived at the first of the Articles on the Consent Calendar, the Moderator 
outlined the procedure for dealing with the Articles on the Consent Calendar. A 
Motion was made and seconded, as provided under Article II, Section 13 of the 
General Bylaws, to adopt the motions listed under the Articles on the Consent 
Calendar, those being Articles 4, 5, 6, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20, 27 and 28. Following a 
brief review by the Moderator of the substance of the action proposed under 
each of the articles, the motion was passed unanimously. 

ARTICLE 4 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town set the salaries of the elected officials of the Town at the 
following amounts for the fiscal year beginning July 1 , 2010: 

Board of Selectmen Chair $200.00 

Board of Selectmen (other members, each) $100.00 
Town Clerk $73,466.58 



28 



Assessors Chair $200.00 

Assessors (other members, each) $100.00 

Water Commissioners (each) $75.00 

ARTICLE 5 Proposed by the Board of Assessors 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town accept Chapter 73, Section 4 of the Acts of 1986 as amended 
by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988, for the purpose of increasing the real 
estate tax exemptions by 100 percent to all persons who qualify for property 
tax exemptions under Clauses 17, 17C, 17C1/2, 17D, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C, 
22D, 22E, 37, 37A, 41, 41 B and 41 C under Chapter 59, Section 5 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

ARTICLE 6 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town raise and appropriate $25,000 by taxation to fund the 
Town's Senior Tax Work-off Program, as established pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5K, as amended by 
Chapter 27, Section 24, of the Acts of 2009 (increasing the maximum amount 
of the deduction that eligible seniors may take from their property tax bill from 
the current $750 to the new limit of $1000 effective July 1 , 2010). 

ARTICLE 7 Proposed by the Finance Committee 

Finance Committee Chair John Koenig presented an overview of the 
proposed FY2011 operating budget. Selectman Gary Taylor then detailed the 
Town Operating portion of the budget; School Committee Chair Julie Dobrow 
presented the K-8 budget, illustrated with a musical video; Lincoln Sudbury 
Regional District School Committee Chair Rahda Gargeya, followed by interim 
LS Superintendent Scott Carpenter, presented the L-S budget, with "color" again 
provided by way of a short video; Kemon Taschioglou demurred on Minuteman 
Regional High School's budget in favor of later discussion (cf. Article 26) 
concerning its proposed feasibility study; and Library Chair Jacquelin Apsler and 
Director Barbara Myles made brief comments on its budget. 

Budget Item 17751 ($29,000 for the IT Strategic Plan) was held out for separate 
consideration; following action on the main motion this item was subsequently, 
after brief discussion, unanimously approved. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town adopt as the FY11 budget appropriations the 
recommendations listed in the report of the Finance Committee, printed on 
34-40 inclusive, of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 2010 Annual 
Town Meeting [as summarized below]: 



29 



APPROPRIATION SUMMARY 




GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


2,496,903.00 


PUBLIC SAFETY 


3,279,018.00 


EDUCATION 


13,129,361.62 


PUBLIC WORKS & FACILITIES 


1,339,826.00 


HUMAN SERVICES 


181,915.00 


CULTURE & RECREATION 


1,372,762.87 


DEBT SERVICE 


1,179,082.50 


UNCLASSIFIED 


5,790,886.00 


WATER DEPARTMENT 


1,035,998.00 


TOTAL -ARTICLE 7 


29,805,752.99 



With the following exceptions: 

Dept 1611 Library - Personnel Services - decrease by $5,506.66 

from $616, 755 to $61 1,248.34 

Dept 1611 Library - Expense - increase by $5,506.66 from 

171,801.87 to $177,308.53 

Dept. 17750 MacDowell Land Acquisition - decrease by $104,000 

from $140,000 to $36,000 - delete line items "Principal 
Long-Term Debt" and "Interest Long-Term Debt" and 
insert line item "Interest on Short-Term Debt". 

And that all items be raised by taxation except to the 
following extent: 

Dept. 1491 Cemetery Department - Expenses - $6,000 to be 

taken from Cemetery Perpetual Care Trust Fund Income 
-Expendable Trust. 

Dept. 1491 Cemetery Department - Expenses - $6,000 to be 

taken from Cemetery Sale of Lots - Receipts Reserved 
for Appropriation. 



30 



Dept. 1171 

Dept. 1290 

Dept. 1290 

Dept. 61451 



Dept. 614513 
Dept. 1792 
Dept. 17748 



Conservation Commission - Personnel Services - 

$3,000 to be taken from Wetlands Protection Fees - 
Receipts Reserved for Appropriation. 

Town Offices - Personnel Services - $71,000 to be 
taken from the Hanscom Fund. 

Town Offices - Personnel Services - $60,000 to be 
taken from Water Revenue. 

Water Department 

• Personnel Services - $386,098 to be taken 

• from Water Revenue; 

• Expenses - $425,900 to be taken from- Water 
Revenue. 

• Debt Service - $179,000 to be taken from Water 
Revenue. 

Water Department - Emergency Reserve - $45,000 to 
be taken from Water Surplus/Retained Earnings. 

Debt Service - Fire Truck Engine 2 - $19,305 to be 
taken from Fund Balance Reserved for Debt Service. 

Debt Service - Road Project -$17,500 to be taken from 
Fund Balance Reserved for Debt Service. 



ARTICLE 8 Proposed by the Selectmen 

After Selectman Gary Taylor advised that, given the town's on-going 
financial challenges, it is likely that a revised capital planning process by-law will 
be brought before a future town meeting, it is 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town pass over Article 8. 

ARTICLE 9 Proposed by the Selectmen 

Selectman Gary Taylor introduced Capital Planning Committee Chair Al 
Schmertzler, who presented a brief description of each of the following Cash 
Capital items. Item C, held out for further discussion, is adopted unanimously 
following action on the main motion, to wit: 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the town accept a report from the Capital Planning Committee and that 
the following amounts (items A - J) be raised and appropriated by taxation 
for the following purposes: 

(see Table on Next Page) 



31 





Capital Project 


Amount of 
Funding 


A 


To fund the purchase of a replacement slide-in sander and any related 
equipment for the Highway Department, including all costs incidental and 
related thereto, and to authorize disposal of, by sale or otherwise, any related 
excess equipement. 


$19,000 


B 


To fund the purchase of a BobCat with attachments and any related 
equipment for the Highway Department, including all costs incidental and 
related thereto, and to authorize disposal of, by sale or otherwise, any related 
excess equipment. 


$52,000 


C 


To fund the purchase of a replacement Car 1 and any related equipment for 
the Fire Department, including all costs incidental and related thereto, and to 
authorize disposal of, by sale or otherwise, any related excess equipment. 


$32,620 


D 


To fund the purchase of two replacement cruisers and any related equipment 
for the Police Department, including all costs incidental and related thereto, 
and to authorize disposal of, by sale or otherwise, any related excess 
equipment. 


$60,000 


E 


To fund the purchase and installation of replacement carpting for certain 
sections of the Lincoln Library, including all costs incidental and related 
thereto. 


$21,672 


F 


To fund the purchase and installation of an emergency generator and any 
related equipment for the Town Offices building, including all costs incidental 
and related thereto. 


$44,000 


G 


To fund the necessary asbestos abatement at the Hartwell School, including 
all costs incidental and related thereto. 


$28,000 


H 


To fund the necessary repair of various Lincoln School campus buildings to 
include resealing and other repairs to the Brooks School roof and the painting 
of various exterior curtain walls, including all costs incidental and related 
thereto. 


$80,000 


1 


To fund the replacement or repair of portions of the asphalt paving at the 
Lincoln School campus, including all costs incidental and related thereto. 


$21,000 


J 


To fund the purchase of a replacement vehicle and new trailer and any 
related equipment, for the Lincolnn Schools, including all costs incidetnal and 
related thereto, and to authorize disposal of, by sale or otherwise, any related 
excess equipment. 


$18,000 



32 



ARTICLE 10 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate by borrowing the sum of 
$200,000 to purchase a new ambulance and related equipment for 
the Fire Department, and other costs incidental and related thereto; 
and that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, borrow 
the full amount of such appropriation under General Laws 
Chapter 44 or any other general or special law, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town in connection therewith; provided, however, that 
the vote taken hereunder shall be expressly contingent upon 
approval by the voters of a ballot question to exclude the amounts 
required to pay for the bonds or notes from the provisions of 
Proposition 2-1/2, so-called. 

ARTICLE 1 1 Proposed by the Selectmen 

Selectmen Gary Taylor introduced IT Strategic Planning Committee 
member Ellen Meadors, who made a presentation on behalf of the committee. 
Following discussion from IT Director Chuck Miller and various residents, it was 

VOTED: (By voice vote declared by the Moderator to exceed the 
required two-thirds) 

That the Town raise and appropriate by borrowing the sum of $725,000 for 
the costs of purchasing and installing information technology equipment and 
support services, including related hardware, software, licenses, training, 
maintenance and other costs incidental and related thereto; and that the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, borrow the full amount of such 
appropriation under General Laws Chapter 44 or any other general or special 
law, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town in connection therewith; 
provided, however, that the vote taken hereunder shall be expressly 
contingent upon approval by the voters of a ballot question to exclude the 
amounts required to pay for the bonds or notes from the provisions of 
Proposition 2-1/2, so-called. 

ARTICLE 12 Proposed by the Selectmen 

Following a brief presentation by Conservation Commission Co-Chair 
Peter Von Mertens and Rural Land Foundation Executive Director Geoff 
McGean, McGean moves to amend the main motion, based on the success of 
their private fund raising efforts, to reduce the amount to be appropriated by 
borrowing from one million to the sum of $793,000. After ringing endorsements 
from Gary Clayton on behalf of the Mass. Audubon Society and Bryce Wolf for 
the Planning Board, the amendment to reduce the amount passes unanimously, 
following which it is 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

33 



That the Town raise and appropriate by borrowing the sum of $793,000 for 
the purchase, and other costs incidental and related thereto, of property 
owned by Roy S. MacDowell, Trustee of Stonehedge Farm Nominee Trust 
consisting of 21 +/- acres of land located on Old Sudbury Road (Assessor's 
Map and Parcel 126-1 - 0) for agricultural and conservation purposes and 
for the purpose of granting restrictions, easements, options, rights of reverter 
and/or rights of first refusal for the purpose of preserving the land for 
agricultural or conservation purposes; and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such land on such terms and conditions and subject to 
such restrictions, easements and rights as the Selectmen may determine, 
and to grant restrictions, easements and rights as the Selectmen may 
determine; and that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
borrow the full amount of such appropriation under General Laws Chapter 44 
or any other general or special law, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
in connection therewith; provided, however, that the vote taken hereunder 
shall be expressly contingent upon approval by the voters of a ballot question 
to exclude the amounts required to pay for the bond or any notes issued for 
such purchase from the provisions of Proposition 2 14, so called. 



After which, the Moderator recesses the meeting until 2:00 pm. 
ARTICLE 13 Proposed by the School Committee 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate by borrowing the sum of $650,000 for 
funding of the K-8 Building Feasibility Study for the Lincoln K-8 School on the 
Ballfield Road Campus, and other costs incidental and related thereto; and to 
meet said appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow said sum under M.G.L. Chapter 44, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town in connection 
therewith; that the Town acknowledges that the Massachusetts School 
Building Authority's ("MSBA") grant program is a non-entitlement, 
discretionary program based on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any 
costs the Town incurs in excess of any grant approved by and received from 
the MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town, and further provided 
that the appropriation hereunder shall be subject to and contingent upon an 
affirmative vote of the Town to exempt the amounts required for the payment 
of interest and principal on said borrowing from the limitations on taxes 
imposed by M.G.L. 59, Section 21 C (Proposition 2 1 / 2 ), and that the amount of 
borrowing authorized pursuant to this vote shall be reduced by any grant 
amount set forth in the Feasibility Study Agreement that may be executed 
between the Town and the MSBA. 



34 



ARTICLE 14 Proposed by the School Committee 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $75,000 by taxation for the 
repair and rehabilitation of classrooms at the Lincoln School campus, 
including all costs incidental and related thereto. 

ARTICLE 15 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $79,175 by taxation for the 
repair and maintenance of certain Town buildings, including all costs incidental 
and related thereto. 



ARTICLE 16 Proposed by the Library Trustees 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $19,000 by taxation for the 
repair and maintenance of the Lincoln Library, including all costs incidental 
and related thereto. 

ARTICLE 17 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the consent Calendar) 

That the Town accept and expend such sum or sums of money that may be 
available under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 90, 
Section 34, Clause 2(a) or other state roadway reimbursement programs and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a contract with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Massachusetts Highway Department and 
to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
borrow in anticipation of 100% reimbursement of said amounts if determined 
necessary. 

ARTICLE 18 Proposed by the Selectmen 

After the Moderator reads an appreciation by the Award's founder, Paul 
Marsh, and Selectwoman Sara Mattes expresses the town's gratitude, it is 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town act on a recommendation from the Board of Selectmen and 
Finance Committee and present the annual Bright Light Award to James 
Cunningham, and appropriate $500 to support the award. 



35 



ARTICLE 19 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $100,000 by taxation to fund 
the Group Insurance Liability Fund established by Chapter 474 of the Acts of 
2008, which Fund will allow the Town to meet the so-called "other post 
employment benefits" funding obligations established by the Statements 43 
and 45 of the General Accounting Standards Board. 

ARTICLE 20 Proposed by the School Committee 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town transfer from free cash the sum of $36,000, which is equal to 
the state reimbursement amounts for Special Education Medicaid expenses, 
to supplement the FY1 1 Lincoln School operating budget. 

ARTICLE 21 Proposed by the Finance Committee 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $89,862.79 from Lincoln's Public High 
School Stabilization Fund, previously established at the March 28, 2009 
Town Meeting, Article 28, in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 5B, for the purpose of funding a portion of the FY1 1 
assessment for the Lincoln Sudbury High School budget. 

ARTICLE 22 Proposed by the Finance Committee 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town transfer from free cash the sum of $2,439,675 to reduce the 
total amount to be raised by taxation pursuant to the votes previously taken 
under Article 7 of this Warrant; or any other article of this Warrant authorizing 
the appropriation of funds. 

ARTICLE 23 Proposed by the Water Commissioners 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town transfer from Water Enterprise Retained Earnings the sum of 
$15,000 for necessary pump station maintenance involving the roof and 
painting of the exterior of the building, including all costs incidental and related 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 24 Proposed by the Water Commissioners 

After outgoing Water Commissioner Andrew Hall commends the new 
Superintendent, Greg Woods, it is 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

36 



That the Town transfer from Water Enterprise Retained Earnings the sum of 
$75,000 for necessary filtration plant instrumentation upgrades involving the 
telemetry, ICP modules and analyzers, including all costs incidental and 
related thereto. 

ARTICLE 25 Proposed by the Water Commissioners 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town transfer from Water Enterprise Retained Earnings the sum of 
$25,000 for the purchase of a new utility truck and related equipment, including 
all costs incidental and related thereto, and to authorize the disposal by sale or 
otherwise of any related excess vehicle or equipment. 

ARTICLE 26 Proposed by the Selectmen 

Minuteman Regional School representative Kemon Taschioglou 
acknowledges the leadership of Superintendent Ed Bouquillon and extols the 
school's recently completed Energy Efficiency up-grade before it is 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town hereby approves the sum of $ 725,000 of borrowing 
authorized by the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District, 
for the purpose of paying costs of a feasibility study to consider options for 
making improvements to the District's high school building located at 758 
Marrett Road, Lexington, Massachusetts, which options shall include, but not 
be limited to renovating, reconstructing, expanding, remodeling and adding to 
the District's high school, or any combination of the foregoing, said sum to be 
expended at the direction of the School Building Committee. The 
Massachusetts School Building Authority's grant program is a non- 
entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as determined by the 
MSBA, and any costs of the Project that the District incurs in excess of any 
grant approved by and received from the MSBA shall be the sole 
responsibility of the District, and that the total amount of the borrowing 
authorized by this vote shall be reduced by any grant amount set forth in the 
Feasibility Study Agreement that may be executed between the District and 
the MSBA. 

ARTICLE 27 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town increase the fee charged for each written demand issued by 
the Tax Collector from Five Dollars ($5.00) to Ten Dollars ($10.00) to be 
added and collected as part of the tax as authorized by Massachusetts 
General Law Chapter 60, Section 15. 

ARTICLE 28 Proposed by the Selectmen 



37 



VOTED: (Unanimously, on the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town reauthorize the revolving accounts previously established by 
vote of the Town under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
53E 1 / 2 , for the following purposes and as shown in the table that follows: 
school bus fees, pre-school tuitions, fire alarm maintenance fees, firearms 
licenses fees and housing rental income; with amendments to the FY11 
student transportation and pre-school program income fund amounts as 
shown in bold in the table below; said fees of the revolving accounts to be 
expended by the authorized entity without further appropriation. 



FUND 


REVENUE 
SOURCE 


AUTHORITY 

TO SPEND 

FUNDS 


USE OF FUNDS 


SPENDING LIMIT 


Student 
Transport-ation 


Bus Fees 


School 
Committee 


To defray expenses related to student 
transportation. 


$80,000 

(was previously 

$70,000) 


Pre-School 
Program 


User Fees 


School 
Committee 


To defray expenses related to Pre-School 
Program services. 


$135,000 

(was previously 

$90,000) 


Fire Alarm 


Fire Alarm Fees 


Lincoln Fire 
Department 


To defray expenses related to fire alarm 
services. 


$25,000 


Affordable 
Housing 


Rental Income 


Housing 
Commission 


To defray expenses for maintenance and 
rehabilitation of town-owned affordable 
homes and to cover administrative costs of 
the Housing Commission for running the 
housing program. 


$75,000 


Firearms 
Licenses 


Firearm Fees 


Lincoln Police 
Department 


To defray expenses for the cost of 
administering the firearms licensing 
program. 


$85,000 



ARTICLE 29 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town authorize the Lincoln Fire Department to establish a revolving 
fund account in accordance with Chapter 44, Section 53E 1 /^ of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, for the purpose of placing in the revolving fund 
account revenues raised through ambulance service charges; said funds 
shall be expended under the authority of the Lincoln Fire Department without 
further appropriation up to a maximum of $90,000 for the upcoming fiscal 
year in order to defray the costs of ambulance service operations; and to 
build the balance in the fund to offset the purchase of a future ambulance, 
and provided further that said balance shall remain in the fund provided that 
said fund is reauthorized in the succeeding fiscal year. 



38 



ARTICLE 30 Proposed by the Community Preservation Committee 



VOTED: (By majority) 

That the town receive and act upon a report from the Community 
Preservation Committee and that the following amounts (items A - L) be 
appropriated or reserved from Fiscal Year 2011 Community Preservation 
Fund Revenues, or transferred from prior year's revenues for Community 
Preservation purposes: 





PROJECT 


Total 
Appropriations 


Source of Appropriation: 




Appropriations: 






A 


To fund, for historic preservation purposes, a study to 
examine the feasibility of renovating the Town Offices 
Buidling. 


$135,000.00 


$135,000 from general CPA 
fund balance 


B 


For open space perservation purposes, to provide funds 
toward the purchase, by the Town of Lincoln, of 21 
acres of land currently owned by Roy McDowell on Old 
Sudbury Road in Lincoln, MA. 


$400,000.00 


$200,000 from CPA open 
space reserves, $200,000 
from general CPA fund 
balance 


C 


To renew funds that were committed in FY2010 to the 
town's Affordable Housing Trust Fund toward the 
purchase of affordable housing units. 


$488,000.00 


$488,000 from general CPA 
fund balance 


D 


To appropriate funds to the town's Affordable Housing 
Trust Fund for the purchase of additional affordable 
housing units. 


$200,000.00 


$200,000 from general CPA 
fund balance 


E 


To appropriate funds to the town's Affordable Housing 
Trust Fund for the purpose of maintaining the 
affordability of 3 units at Battle Road Farm. 


$60,000.00 


$60,000 from general CPA 
fund balance 


F 


For purposes of historic preservation, to appropriate 
funds for the restoration and preservation of Lincoln's 
vital records dated 1754, the year the Town was 
incoporated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 


$4,500.00 


$4,500 from general CPA 
fund balance 


G 


To fund CPC administrative expensses. 


$3,000.00 


$3,000 from CPA FY11 
projected revenues 


H 


To fund FY1 1 debt service payments due on the third 
year permanent borrowing for previously voted CPA 
projects. 


$130,837.50 


$130,837.50 from CPA 
FY1 1 projected revenues 




Project Appropriation Subtotal: 


$1,421,337.50 




! i 


Housing Reserve 


$81,278.00 


from CPA FY1 1 projected 
revenues 


j 


Open Space/Land Acquisition Reserve 


$81,278.00 


from CPA FY1 1 projected 
revenues 


K 


Historic Preservation Reserve 


$81,278.00 


from CPA FY1 1 projected 
revenues 


L 


Recreation Reserve 


$0.00 


from CPA FY1 1 projected 
revenues 




Reserve Sub-Total: 


$243,834.00 






Total: 


$1,665,171.50 





39 



Article 30 Explanations 



This article proposes projects recommended by the Community Preservation 
Committee under Lincoln's Community Preservation Act (CPA) passed at the 
March, 2002 Annual Town Meeting and the November, 2002 Election. The 
descriptions of the proposed projects/actions are contained below: 

A. Town Offices Building - This feasibility study is directed at examining the 
historic preservation of the Town Offices Building as relates to its continued use 
as a municipal offices building. Study will be overseen by a citizen-based 
committee appointed by the Selectmen and will be performed by a qualified 
architectural/engineering firm. It will involve a needs analysis of the existing 
building, a programmatic study review, discussion of alternative siting of offices 
and meeting spaces, and any necessary engineering studies. 

B. Preservation of Open Space - Purchase of Land on Old Sudbury Road - 

This proposal authorizes the expenditure of CPA funds toward the purchase of 
21 acres of land on Old Sudbury Road in Lincoln that is currently owned by Roy 
McDowell and was recently taken out of Agricultural Restriction and offered for 
sale for $2,980,000. The property is rolling pasture land on the south side of the 
road and is a vital connector between Drumlin Farm and a wooded land corridor 
that extends into Weston and connects with trails in both Weston and Wayland. 
The land will remain open and in agricultural use. Purchase of this property will 
be by a consortium that involves not only CPA funds but also contributions from 
Mass. Audubon, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, private donations, and a 
bond from the Town of Lincoln presented under Article 12. The proposed 
expenditure of CPA funds is contingent upon the successful completion of the 
purchase. 

C. Affordable Housing Trust Fund - The town authorized the creation of an 
Affordable Housing Trust at Town Meeting in 2006. At Town Meeting in 2008, the 
town authorized the appropriation of $900,000 in seed money to enable the Trust 
to create and preserve affordable housing for the benefit of low and moderate 
income households. These funds were to be subjected to a "claw back" 
provision, whereby any funds not expended or reserved prior to January 1, 2009 
were to be returned to the CPA balance. This section authorizes the $488,000 
balance from last year's funds to be "rolled over" to allow the Town to continue to 
pursue affordable housing opportunities and achieve compliance with the 10% 
minimum threshold required by Chapter 40B of Massachusetts General Laws. 
These funds will be subject to a grant agreement between the Trust and the CPC 
which provides, among other things, that none of those funds shall be expended 
without the approval of the Community Preservation Committee, and that the 
unexpended balance of the appropriation authorized hereunder, as of January 1, 
201 1 , shall be returned to the Community Preservation Fund. 

40 



D. Affordable Housing Trust Fund - This proposal authorizes that an additional 
sum of $200,000 be appropriated for the purchase of affordable housing 
according to the terms specified in Section C above. 

E. Affordable Housing Trust Fund - This proposal authorizes that $60,000 of 
CPA funds be expended for the express purpose of helping to maintain the 
affordability of 3 Battle Road Farm affordable units. These funds will be matched 
by like contributions from the Lincoln Foundation and DHCD. These amounts 
are required because the original deed restrictions for Battle Road Farm did not 
sufficiently restrict an affordable buyer's market appreciation. Hence, steps are 
needed to repurchase and restructure these units, so they may be maintained as 
affordable units. 

F. Preservation of the Town's Vital Records 1754-1811. These leather-bound 
volumes contain extensive hand-written vital records starting in the year that 
Lincoln was incorporated as a Town within the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. The half leather and half decorated paper case binding is worn; 
the pages are discolored with some tears; and the ink varies in intensity 
throughout the volume. Extensive treatment is needed to restore and preserve 
this important historical document. 

G. Administrative Expenses - These funds will be used primarily to pay the 
$2,500 annual membership dues in the Community Preservation Coalition, a 
statewide organization that represents the interests of CPA communities. The 
balance will be available for costs associated with public information, mailings, 
and public hearings. Any funds not spent prior to the end of FY 11 will be 
returned to the CPA funds. 

H. FY10 Debt Service payments - Debt payment costs associated with third 
year of permanent financing for previously voted CPA projects pursuant to Article 
8 of the April 2, 2005 Town Meeting including the Harrington Row Land 
Acquisition, Affordable Housing-Sunnyside Lane Construction and Rehabilitation, 
and Library Gund Roof Replacement. 

I. Housing Reserve Fund -The CPA requires that a minimum of 10% of annual 
revenues be spent or set aside for affordable housing. 

J. Open Space/Land Acquisition Reserve Fund - The CPA requires that a 
minimum of 10% of annual revenues be spent or set aside for Open Space/Land 
Conservation. 

K. Historic Preservation - The CPA requires that a minimum of 10% of annual 
revenues be spent or set aside for historic preservation. 



41 



L. Recreation - The CPA permits, but does not require, the town to spend or set 
aside funds for recreational purposes. No funds are reserved for recreational 
purposes at this time. 



ARTICLE 31 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town adopt the "Stretch Energy Code" set forth in the State 
Building Code at 780 CMR 120.AA (i.e., Appendix 120.AA), as may be 
amended from time to time, and to amend the Town's General By-laws, 
Article XI, by inserting a new Section 17, entitled "Stretch Energy Code", as 
set forth below: 

17. Stretch Energy Code 

(a) Adoption. The Town of Lincoln has adopted the provisions 
of 780 CMR 120.AA (i.e., Appendix 120.AA of the State Building 
Code or the "Stretch Energy Code"), as may be amended from 
time to time, in place of the provisions set forth under 780 CMR 
13.00, 34.00, 61 .00 and 93.00. 

(b) Purpose. The purpose of the Stretch Energy Code shall be 
to provide the Town with a more energy efficient alternative to 
the base energy code otherwise set forth under the State 
Building Code. 

ARTICLE 32 Proposed by the Selectmen 

Selectman Sara Mattes introduced Planning Board member Ken Hurd, 
who reported the Green Energy Committee origin and the Planning Board's 
affirmative recommendation of this amendment to the town's Zoning By-laws 
before it was 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town amend Zoning Bylaw Section 12 as follows for the purpose of 
establishing a solar photovoltaic facilities overlay district, and to correct a 
past transcription error, and that the Town amend the Zoning Map to show 
the designated location. Note: Proposed Additions to the bylaw language 
are shown in bolded italicized text and De le t i ons are shown in crossed-out 
bolded text as follows: 

Amend the introduction to Section 12 as follows: 

SECTION 12. OVERLAY DISTRICTS. The C-Open Space Conservation 
District, the W-Wetlands and Watershed Protection District, the FP-Flood 
Plain District, the H-Historic District, the NL-North Lincoln Overlay 

42 



District, the WCF-Wireless Communications Facility Overlay District, a«4 
the SL-South Lincoln Overlay District, and the SP-Solar Photovoltaic 
Facilities Overlay District are hereby established as overlay districts 
and shall be superimposed on other districts established by this By-law. 
Any land lying within such overlay districts shall a l so be subject to the 
development and use regulations of the underlying district to the 
extent not inconsistent with the regulations for the applicable overlay 
district or districts and shall, in addition, conform to the add i tional 
requirements of the one or more overlay districts in which the land lies. 
In the event of any conflict between the provisions of two or more overlay 
districts, which apply to the same parcel of land, the conflict shall be 
resolved by applying the most restrictive provisions. 

Add a new Section 12 8 as follows: 

12.8 SP - SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC FACILITIES OVERLAY DISTRICT 

12.8.1 The purpose of this Section 12.8 is to promote the creation 
of new large-scale ground-mounted solar photovoltaic facilities 
(SPFs) by: establishing areas for construction of SPFs; providing 
standards for the placement, design, construction, operation, 
monitoring, modification and removal of such facilities, which 
standards address public safety and minimize impacts on scenic, 
natural and historic resources; and providing adequate financial 
assurance for the eventual decommissioning of such facilities. 

12.8.2 This section 12.8 applies to and permits the installation and 
operation of large-scale (nameplate capacity of 250 kW DC or 
greater) ground-mounted SPFs in accordance with the provisions 
hereunder. This section also pertains to physical modifications that 
materially alter the type, configuration, or size of these facilities or 
related equipment. 

12.8.3 Location: The Solar Photovoltaic Facilities Overlay District 
shall consist of the following areas: 

1) An area of approximately 5.7 acres within Assessor's Map 19, 
Parcel 4-0, off North Great Road, bounded as follows: from the 
intersection of the northern lot boundary with the Lexington town 
line, running roughly south along the Lexington town line for 350 
feet, then due west for 700 feet, then due north to the northern lot 
boundary and then roughly east along the various segments of the 
northern lot boundary to the Lexington town line. 

12.8.4 No building permit shall be issued for an SPF without prior 
approval by the Planning Board of a site plan in accordance with 
the provisions of Section 17 of this bylaw. Site plans shall be 



43 



deemed constructively approved if not acted upon within one year 
after submission of complete plans. 

12.8.5 Applications for Site Plan Review shall include evidence 
that the utility company that operates the electrical grid where the 
facility is to be located has been informed and consents to the solar 
photovoltaic facility owner or operator's plan to connect to the 
electrical grid. Off-grid systems are exempt from this requirement 

12.8.6 The height of all structures comprising the SPF shall not 
exceed 20 feet above the pre-existing natural grade. 

12.8.7 The applicant shall submit a plan for the operation and 
maintenance of the SPF. 

12.8.8 The owner, operator, successors, and assigns of the SPF 
shall maintain the facility in good condition. Maintenance shall 
include, but not be limited to, painting, structural repairs, and 
integrity of security measures. 

12.8.9 All structures associated with an SPF shall be removed 
within one year of cessation of use. The owner or operator shall 
notify the Planning Board by certified mail of the proposed date 
of discontinued operations and plans for removal. Removal 
shall include: 

(a) Removal of all structures, equipment, security barriers and 
transmission lines from the site. 

(b) Disposal of all solid and hazardous waste in accordance 
with local, state, and federal waste disposal regulations. 

(c) After consultation with the Planning Board, stabilization or 
re-vegetation of the site as necessary to minimize erosion. 
The Planning Board may allow the owner or operator to 
leave landscaping or designated below-grade foundations in 
order to minimize erosion and disruption to vegetation. 

12.8.10 Applicants, other than governmental authorities, shall 
provide a form of surety, either through escrow account, bond 
or otherwise, to cover the cost of removal in the event the Town 
must remove the SPF and remediate the landscape, in an 
amount and form determined to be reasonable by the Planning 
Board, but in no event to exceed 125 percent of the cost of 
removal and compliance with the additional requirements set 
forth herein, as determined by the project proponent. The 
project proponent shall submit a fully inclusive estimate of the 
costs associated with removal, prepared by a qualified 



44 



engineer. The amount shall include a mechanism for calculating 
increased removal costs due to inflation. 



ARTICLE 33 Proposed by the Selectmen 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town amend Section 5 of the Demolition Delay Bylaw, Article XXI, 
for the purpose of establishing the conditions under which, and the process 
by which, fines may be issued for violation of the bylaw as shown below. 
Note: Proposed Additions to the bylaw language are shown in bolded 
italicized text and D e l e tions are shown in crossed-out bolded text as follows: 

Section 5. Non-compliance 

Anyone who demolishes a building or structure identified in Section 2 of this 
By-law without first obtaining, and complying fully with the provisions of, a 
demolition permit, shall be subject to a fine of three hundred dollars ($300) 
for each day, not to exceed sixty (60) days, in which such person was not in 
compliance with the provisions of a demolition permit. This fine shall be 
handled in the manner set forth under Bylaw Article XVI Non Criminal 
Disposition of Violation. Upon determination by the LHC that a building or 
structure is a preferably preserved significant building or structure, the owner 
shall be responsible for properly securing the building or structure, if vacant, 
to the satisfaction of the LBI. Should the owner fail to secure the building or 
structure, the loss of such building or structure through fire or other cause 
shall be considered demolition. In addition, unless a demolition permit was 
obtained for such demolition, and unless such permit was fully complied with, 
the LBI shall not for a period of three (3) years after the date of demolition 
issue a building permit for erection of a building and/or structure, paving of 
driveways or for parking pertaining to any premises on which a building or 
structure identified in Section 2 of this By-law has been demolished. 

ARTICLE 34 Proposed by the Planning Board 

Board Chair Bryce Wolf reports the Board's endorsement of this 
amendment and its recognition of the Aqua, Silvi and Viti members of the Culture 
family before it is 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town amend Zoning Bylaw Section 5.1 as shown below for the 
purpose of bringing Lincoln's Zoning Bylaw into agreement with recent 
changes in state law concerning agriculture-related uses on larger parcels. 
Note: Proposed Additions to the bylaw language are shown in bolded 
italicized text and De le t i ons being shown in crossed-out bolded text as 
follows: 



45 



5.1 The use of land or the expansion, reconstruction or construction of 
structures for the primary purpose of commercial and non-commercial 
agriculture, horticulture, of floriculture, aquaculture, silviculture, or 
viticulture on parcels of mor e than five acres or more shall not be 
prohibited in any district. Land divided by a public or private way or a 
waterway is construed as one parcel. 

ARTICLE 35 Proposed by the Planning Board 

VOTED: (unanimously) 

That the Town amend Zoning Bylaw Section 13.2.7 to change the way front 
yard setbacks are measured as shown below. Note: Proposed Additions to 
the bylaw language are shown in bolded italicized text and D ele t i on s being 
shown in crossed-out bolded text as follows: 

Front yards setbacks shall be measured from any street lines to the nearest 
point of the front wa ll of th e principal building or any accessory structure. 7 
prov i d e d that noth i ng shal l prev e nt th e proj e ct i on of u Uncovered 
steps, cornices, window sills and other ornamental features, and walls and 
fences nor th e construct i on of wall s or f e nc e s wh i ch do not interf e re 
with vision at th e int e rs e ction of two or more str e ets are excluded from 
the calculation of front yard setback. 

ARTICLE 36 Proposed by the Planning Board 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town amend Zoning Bylaw Sec. 21.4 as follows in order 
to extend the timeframe allowed for certain ZBA decisions and bring it into 
agreement with state law. Note: Proposed Additions to the bylaw language 
are shown in bolded italicized text and D e l e t i ons being shown in crossed- 
out bolded text as follows: 

21 .4 If the Board of Appeals or the Planning Board shatt fails to act 

take final action within ninety (90) days of the close of the required public 
hearing on an application for a special permit, or the Board of Appeals shall 
fails to act within s e v e nty - f i v e (75) one hundred (100) days of filing of the 
an appeal, application or petition, other than for a special permit, then the 
p e t i t i on matter shall be deemed approved subject to the fo ll ow i ng 
requirements of G.L C40A, sections 9 and 15. 

(a) Th e p e t i t i on e r, aft e r th e e xp i rat i on of th e afor e said 
p e r i od s , s ha ll f ile with th e Town C le rk a copy of h i s p e t i t i on 
and an a ff i dav i t stat i ng th e dat e of th e pub l ic h e aring or f ili ng 
a 6 the cas e may b e , and th e fai l ur e of th e Board i n qu e st i on 
to r e nd e r a d e c i s i on w i th i n th e r e qu i r e d p e r i od. 



46 



(b) Upon rec e ipt of th e pet i tion and aff i dav i t th e Town Clerk 
sha ll forthw i th g i ve not i c e of th e fi l ing to thos e p e rsons 
e nt i t l ed to a not i c e of th e d e cision und e r Chapt e r 4 0A, 
S e ct i on 15. Th e fi l ing of a p e tit i on and aff i davit i n th e off i c e of 
th e Town C l erk sha ll b e d ee m e d the e quival e nt of th e f ili ng of 
a d e c i s i on for purpos e s of judicia l app e a l s provid e d for 
und e r Chapter 40A, S e ct i on 17. 

(c) I f no app e al i s tak e n with i n th e r e quir e d statutory p e r i od, 
then th e Town C le rk sha ll furnish th e p e t i tion e r w i th a 
c e rt i f ie d copy of th e p e t i t i on and aff i davit tog e th e r with a 
c e rt i ficate that no app e al has b ee n f ile d al l of wh i ch shal l b e 
record e d in the manner pr e scr i b e d under Chapter 4 0A 
S e ction 15 in lie u of the documents requ i r e d to b e recorded 
und e r that s e ct i on. 

ARTICLE 37 Proposed by the Planning Board 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town amend Zoning Bylaw Section 12.3 as shown below to be in 
compliance with the revised Flood Insurance Rate Maps and the National 
Flood Insurance Program. Note: Proposed Additions to the bylaw language 
are shown in bolded italicized text and D e l e tions being shown in crossed-out 
bolded text as follows: 

12.3 FP-FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT . The Floodplain District 
is herein established as an overlay district. The District 
includes all special flood hazard areas within the Town of 
Lincoln designated as Zones A and AE on the Middlesex 
County Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) issued by the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the 
administration of the National Flood Insurance Program. 
The map panels of the 2010 Middlesex County FIRM that are 
wholly or partially within the Town of Lincoln are panel 
numbers 25017 C0379E, 25017C0383E, 25017C0384E, 
25017C0386E, 25017C0387E, 25017C0388E, 25017C0389E, 
25017C0391E, 25017C0392E and 25017C0393E. The exact 
boundaries of the District may be defined by the 100-year 
base flood elevations shown on the FIRM and further 
defined by the 2010 Middlesex County Flood Insurance 
Study (FIS) report. The FIRM and FIS report are 
incorporated herein by reference and are on file with the 
Town Clerk, Planning Board and Building Inspector. The 
FIRM is hereby incorporated as a part of the Zoning Map of 
the Town of Lincoln. 



47 



Th e F l ood P l a i n D is tr i ct is e stab li shed as an ov e r l ay d is tr i ct 
for th e purpo se of comp l ying w i th F e d e ra l F l ood I nsuranc e 
R e gu l at i ons and i nc l ud e s a ll sp e cia l f l ood hazard ar e as 
d esi gnat e d as Zon e A, A1 - 30 on th e L i nco l n F l ood I nsuranc e 
Rat e Map s (F I RM), and th e F l ood Boundary and F l oodway 
Maps, e ff e ct i v e D e c e mber 15, 1985, on f i le w i th th e Town 
C le rk, P l ann i ng Board and Bu il d i ng I nsp e ctor. Th e s e map s 
ar e h e r e by i ncorporat e d as a part of th e Zoning Map of the 
Town of L i ncoln. 

The following Development Regulations apply in the FP-Flood 
Plain District: 

12.3.1 Within Zone AE A1 - 30 , all new construction and 
substantial improvements (the cost of which equals or exceeds 
50 percent of the market value of the structure) of residential and 
non-residential structures shall have the lowest floor, including 
basement, elevated to or above the base flood elevation (100- 
year flood elevation designated on the FIRM). 

12.3.2 Within Zone A, where the base flood elevation is not 
provided on the FIRM, the Building Inspector shall obtain and 
review any already existing base flood elevation data. If the data 
are reasonable, they shall be used to require compliance with 
Section 12.3.1 above. 

12.3.3 Located within the FP-Flood Plain District are areas 
designated as floodways. Since the floodway is an extremely 
hazardous area due to the velocity of flood waters which carry 
debris, potential projectiles, and erosion potential, the following 
provisions shall apply: 

(a) there shall be no encroachments, including fill, new 
construction, substantial improvements, or other development 
unless certification by a registered professional engineer is 
provided demonstrating that encroachments shall not result in 
any increase in flood levels during the occurrence of the 100- 
year flood; 

(b) if Section 12.3.3(a; above is satisfied, all new construction 
and substantial improvements shall comply with all provisions of 
Section 12.3. 

12.3.4 Floodway Data. In Zones A and AE, along 
watercourses that have not had a regulatory floodway 
designated, the best available Federal, State, local, or other 



48 



floodway data shall be used to prohibit encroachments in 
floodways which would result in any increase in flood levels 
within the community during the occurrence of the base 
flood discharge. 

12.3.5 Base Flood Elevation Data. Base flood elevation data 
is required for subdivision proposals or other developments 
greater than 5 acres within unnumbered A zones. 

12.3.6 Notification of Watercourse Alteration - In a 
riverine situation, the Conservation Director shall 
notify adjacent communities, the NFIP State 
Coordinator at Massachusetts Department of 
Conservation, the NFIP Program Specialist at the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency, Region I, 
and other governmental authorities as may from time 
to time have jurisdiction, of any alteration or relocation 
of a watercourse. 

ARTICLE 38 Proposed by the Planning Board 

Planning Board member Dan Boynton explains that this article was 
meant to address proposed land taking by the state occasioned by its on-going 
work at Crosby's Corner. These takings could make some of the residential lots 
in the area non-conforming. Given that no such land takings are imminent at this 
time, it is 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town pass over Article 38. 

ARTICLE 39 Proposed by the Planning Board 

VOTED: (unanimously) 

That the Town amend Zoning Bylaw Section 12.6.6 Conditions, within 
Section 12.6 WCF - Wireless Communications Facilities Overlay District to 
insert one additional condition "(s)" as shown below. Note: Proposed 
Additions to the bylaw language are shown in bolded italicized text and 
D e l e t i ons being shown in crossed-out bolded text as follows: 

(s) Within 30 days of transfer of an interest in all or part of an approved 
WCF, the transferor shall notify the Lincoln Planning Board of such 
transfer and provide the name and address of the transferee, a list of 
equipment and structures transferred, date of the transfer, and 
description of the type of interest transferred (sale, lease, license, etc.). 
The conditions and renewal obligations imposed by a Special Permit 



49 



and the Zoning Bylaw on each of the components of the WCF shall be 
enforceable against the transferor and/or its transferees, as necessary 
to maintain compliance. 

ARTICLE 40 Proposed by the Planning Board 

Following a report by Board Co-chair Bob Domnitz on the state of 
wireless coverage, or its absence, along Rt. 126, and discussion and questions 
from the floor, a motion is made to Adjourn Town Meeting, which the Moderator 
rules to be a Motion to move the Question. That motion is passed unanimously, 
following which it is 

VOTED: (By a majority) 

That the Town accept a report from the Planning Board regarding the status 
of wireless communication coverage along the Rt. 126 corridor. 



Throughout the day, tribute was paid to: 

Sarah Cannon Holden, for her service on the Board of Selectmen; 

Andrew Hall, for his eighteen year tenure as the Water Commission's "CEO;" 

Julie Dobrow, for her distinguished and tireless leadership on the K-8 School 
Committee; and 

Kerry Glass for the historical research underlying the cover of this year's 
Annual Town Report. 



A Motion to Dissolve the 2010 Annual Town Meeting was passed by fiat at 
approximately 4:55 p.m., EST. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Susan F. Brooks 



50 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 

March 29, 2010 

In accordance with Article 1 of the 
Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the polls were opened at 
7:30 a.m. by Town Clerk, Susan F. 
Brooks. The following Wardens 
assisted Ms. Brooks throughout the 
day: Pat Arseneault, Nancy Zuelke, 
Connie Lewis, Jacqueline Snelling, 
Agnes Wiggin, Nancy Pimental, Al 
Schmertzler, Pat Hatsopoulos, and 
Diana Glendon. The polls were 
declared closed at 8:00 p.m. The 
total number of votes cast was 718 
out of 4329 registered voters. 
Results were as follows: 



Annual Town Section 


M*tfi29,2010 




Offices and Cancf dates 
Town Clerk (3 yrs) 
Blanks 


Pct#1 

73 


RctJ2 

37 


Rct#3 


Total 

110 


Susan F.Brooks 


362 


241 




603 


AJI Others 

Board of Selectmen* (3 yrs) 

Banks 


3 
87 


2 
38 




5 
125 


QNoahEckhouse 


350 


241 




591 


/Ml Cthers 

Board of Assessors (3 yrs) 

Blanks 


1 
113 


1 
52 




2 
165 


JohnGRabinscn 


325 


227 




552 


All Others 

School CorrTrittee (3yrs) Vote for 2 





1 




1 
503 


Banks 


315 


188 




Thomas H. Sander 


309 


196 




505 


TirrrtryrfTChristenfeld 


250 


173 




423 


All Others 

Water Conrrissioner (3 yrs) 

Banks 


2 
101 


3 
49 




5 
150 


PadEGese 


336 


231 




567 


All Cthers 

Board of Health (3 yrs) 

Banks 


1 
114 



62 




1 
176 


Arnold N. Weinberg 


324 


216 




540 


All Cthers 

Cemetery Corrrrissioner (3 yrs) 

Banks 



109 


2 
48 




2 
157 


Alexander LPugh 


327 


232 


i 559 


All Cthers 


2 





! 2 



Planning Board (5 yrs) 

Banks 


125 


64 




189 


Robert H. Dormitz 


312 


215 




527 


AJI Cthers 

Planning Board (4 yrs) 

Banks 


1 
116 


1 

61 




2 
177 


Daniel C. Boynton 


321 


219 




540 


All Cthers 

Corrrrissioner of Trust Funds (3 yrs 

Banks 


1 
114 



52 




1 

166 


Douglas B Harding 


323 


227 




550 


AJI Cthers 

Trustee of Berris Fund (3 yrs) 

Banks 


1 
117 


1 
57 




2 
174 


Gertrude M Webb 


321 


222 




543 


AJI Cthers 

Trustee, Lincoln Library (3 yrs) 

Banks 



90 


1 
47 




1 
137 


Susan Hands Taylor 


348 


232 




580 


AJICtters 

Trustee, DeCordova Museum (4 yrs) 

Banks 



135 


1 
72 




1 
207 


Jamie B Jaffee 


303 


208 




511 


AJI Cthers 

Housing Commission (3 yrs) 

Banks 



109 



61 





170 


RagnhildFredriksen 


327 


218 




545 


AJI Cthers 

Recreation Commttee (3 yrs) 

Banks 


2 
98 


1 
50 




3 
148 


Susan B Collins 


340 


229 




569 


All Cthers 

LSRHS(3yrs) Votefor2 
Banks 



264 


1 
156 




1 
420 


Radha Raman Gargeya 


371 


233 




604 


Timothy J. Garvin 


167 


109 




276 


Kevin J. Matthews 


53 


39 




92 


Bryan S Sample 


20 


23 




43 


AJI Cthers 

C#1 Information Technology 

Banks 


1 
78 



43 




1 
121 


YES 


288 


189 




477 


NO 

C#2MacDowell Property 
Banks 


72 
4 


48 
11 




120 
15 


YES 


387 


228 




615 


NO 

G#3K-8 Feasibility 

Banks 


47 
17 


41 
16 




88 
33 


YES 


347 


194 




541 


NO 

C#4RreDept.Arrbulance 
Banks 


74 
18 


70 
17 




144 
35 


YES 


358 


215 


573 


NO 

QH5 Off Premises Wine &Malt 

Banks 


62 

15 


48 
11 




110 
26 


YES 


356 


215 




571 


NO 


67 


54 




121 


Total votes cast: 


438 


280 




718 



51 



STATE PRIMARY 

September 14, 2010 

Pursuant to a Warrant 
duly served, the Polls 
were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Town 
Clerk, Susan F. Brooks, 
who was assisted 
throughout the day by 
the following Deputy 
Wardens: Nancy 

Pimental, Connie Lewis, 
Belinda Gingrich, Karen 
Moss, Agnes Wiggin, 
Eric Harris, Al 

Schmertzler and Diana 
Glendon. The Polls 
were declared closed at 
8:00 p.m. The total 
number of votes cast 
were 736, divided as 
follows: 

Democratic - 496; 
Republican - 240;and 
Libertarian - 0. 

The total number of 
voters registered at this 
election was 4361. 



State Primary Section Results - September 14, 2010 



Democratic Ballot 

Offices & Candidates 




Republican Ballot 

Offices & Candidates 




Libertarian Ballot 
Offices & Candidates 




Governor 


TotaJ 


I Governor 


TotaJ 


Governor 


Total 


Blanks 

Deval L Patrick 

Write-ins 


39 
453 

4 


Blanks 

Charles D. Baker 
Write-ins 


23 
216 
1 


Blanks 
Write-ins 






Lieutenant Governor 




Lieutenant Governor 




Lieutenant Governor 




Blanks 

Timothy P. Murray 

Write-ins 


57 
439 



Blanks 

Richard R Tisei 
Write-ins 


43 
196 
1 


Blanks 
Write-ins 






Attorney General 




Attorney General 




Attorney General 




Blanks 

Martha Coakley 
Write-ins 


60 
436 



Blanks 
Write-ins 
CarboneW-l 
McKemaW-l 


168 
10 
10 
52 


Blanks 
Write-ins 






Secretary of State 


68 
428 



Secretary of State 

Blanks 

William C. Campbell 

Write-ins 


58 
182 



Secretary of State 




Blanks 

William Francis Galvin 

Write-ins 


Blanks 
Write-ins 






Treasurer 




Treasurer 


51 

189 



30 
185 
25 


52 
96 
92 



Treasurer 




Blanks 

Steven Grossman 
Stephen J. Murphy 
Write-ins 


47 
386 
63 



Blanks 

Karyn E. Pdito 
Write-ins 


Blanks 
Write-ins 

Auditor 

Blanks 
Write-ins 






Auditor 

Blanks 

Suzanne M. Bump 
Guy William Qodis 
Mike Lake 
Write-ins 


49 
275 
32 
140 



Auditor 

Blarfcs 

MaryZ Comaughton 

Kamal Jain 

Write-ins 

Rep. in Congress 






Rep. in Congress 


Rep. in Congress 

Blanks 
Write-ins 

Councillor 




Blanks 

Edward J. Markey 

Write-ins 

Councillor 


39 
456 
1 


Blanks 

Gerry Dembrowski 

Thomas P. Tierney 

Write-ins 

Councillor 

Blanks 
Write-ins 






Blanks 

Marilyn Petitto Devaney 

Corey A Belanger 

Write-ins 


174 
224 
97 
1 


228 

12 


Blanks 
Write-ins 






Senator in Gen. Court 




Senator in Gen. Court 




Senator in Gen. Court 


Blanks 

Susan C. Fargo 
Write-ins 


47 
446 
3 


Blanks 

Eric Richard Dahlberg 

Sandra B. Martinez 

Write-ins 


14 
125 
101 



Hanks 
Write-ins 






Rep in Gen. Court 




Rep. in Gen. Court 




Rep. in Gen, Court 




Blanks 

Thomas P. Conroy 

Write-ins 


59 
437 



Blanks 
Write-ins 


229 

11 


Blanks 
Write-ins 






District Attorney 




District Attorney 




District Attorney 




Blanks 

Gerard T. Leone, Jr. 

Write-ins 


112 
383 
1 


Blanks 
Write-ins 


229 

11 


Blanks 
Write-ins 






Sheriff 




Sheriff 




Sheriff 




Blanks 

James V. DiPaola 

Write-ins 


138 
357 
1 


Blanks 
Write-ins 


231 
9 


Blanks 
Write-ins 








486 


Total Votes Cast 


240 




o 



52 



STATE ELECTION 

November 2,2010 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, 
the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Susan F. Brooks, 
Town Clerk, who was assisted 
throughout the day by the following 
Deputy Wardens: Nancy Pimental, 
Al Schmertzler, Agnes Wiggin, 
Nancy Zuelke, Connie Lewis and 
Martha Lufkin. The total number of 
votes cast were 2865; the total 
number of registered voters for this 
election was 4415. 



State Election November 2, 2010 
All Pets. -FINAL TALLY 



Offices & Candidates 


Pet 1 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Total 


Governor and Lt. Gov. 










Blanks 


6 


10 


2 


18 


Patrick & Murray 


1029 


825 


10 


1864 


Baker & Tisei 


392 


460 


26 


878 


Cah ill & Loscocco 


28 


29 


2 


59 


Stein & Purcell 


29 


13 





42 


All others 


1 


3 





4 


Attorney General 










Blanks 


23 


28 


2 


53 


Martha Coakley 


1140 


924 


13 


2077 


James P. McKenna 


322 


387 


25 


734 


All others 





1 





1 


Secretary of State 










Blanks 


61 


56 


2 


119 


William Francis Galvin 


1093 


903 


14 


2010 


William C. Campbell 


300 


357 


24 


681 


James D. Henderson 


31 


23 





54 


All others 





1 





1 


Treasurer 










Blanks 


60 


42 


2 


104 


Steven Grossman 


1032 


849 


13 


1894 


Karyn E. Polito 


393 


446 


25 


864 


All others 





3 





3 


Auditor 










Blanks 


111 


90 


1 


202 


Suzanne M. Bump 


781 


625 


12 


1418 


Mary Z. Connaughton 


502 


557 


27 


1086 


Nathanael Alexander Fortune 


91 


66 





157 


All others 





2 





2 


Representative in Congress 










Blanks 


36 


30 


2 


68 


Edward J. Markey 


1119 


907 


13 


2039 


Gerry Dembrowski 


330 


402 


25 


757 


All others 





1 





1 


Councillor 










Blanks 


247 


228 


6 


481 


Marilyn Petito Devaney 


898 


728 


16 


1642 


Nicholas A. lannuzzi 


339 


383 


18 


740 


All others 


1 


1 





2 


Senator in General Court 










Blanks 


43 


34 


2 


79 


Susan C. Fargo 


1092 


894 


13 


1999 


Sandra B. Martinez 


349 


411 


25 


785 


All others 


1 


1 




2 


Rep. in General Court 










Blanks 


345 


370 


14 


729 


Thomas P. Conroy 


1125 


956 


24 


2105 


All others 


15 


14 


2 


31 


District Attorney 










Blanks 


407 


426 


14 


847 


Gerard T. Leone, Jr. 


1067 


904 


24 


1995 


All others 


11 


10 


2 


23 


Sheriff 










Blanks 


295 


307 


7 


609 


James V. DiPaola 


929 


812 


22 


1763 


Michael S. Tranchita, Sr. 


259 


217 


10 


486 


All others 


2 


4 


1 


7 


Q # 1 Repeal State Sales Tax on 


Alcoholic Beverages 






Blanks 


46 


48 


5 


99 


Yes 


431 


439 


24 


894 


No 


1008 


853 


11 


1872 


Q # 2 Modify Affordable Housing Law 








Blanks 


105 


97 


7 


209 


Yes 


461 


458 


15 


934 


No 


919 


785 


18 


1722 


Q # 3 Reduce State Sales Tax 










Blanks 


19 


32 


5 


56 


Yes 


399 


390 


26 


815 


No 


1067 


918 


9 


1994 


Q # 4 PPQ Single Payer Health Care 








Blanks 


140 


132 


5 


277 


Yes 


928 


769 


15 


1712 


No 


417 


439 


20 


876 


Q # 5 Re: PPQ on Marijuana Reg 


ulation 








Blanks 


130 


130 


5 


265 


Yes 


933 


766 


20 


1719 


No 


422 


444 


15 


881 


Total ballots cast: 


1485 


1340 


40 


2865 



53 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Walter Jabs 

Graham Walker 

Beth S. Ries, Chairman 

One of the Board's primary responsibilities is to oversee the 
Town's personnel system and assure that job classifications and 
compensation are equitable among non-union employees and in 
line with comparable communities. The Board does not initiate 
changes in employee grades or job descriptions unless requested 
by the department, board or committee for which an employee 
works. In recent years, almost every department has seen 
circumstances alter their operations and the nature of its 
employees' responsibilities change, necessitating a review of their 
job descriptions and possible changes in grade. During 2010 the 
board considered revisions to current job descriptions for several 
departments, but also reviewed them for two new positions. The 
Cemetery Commission and the Library Trustees have each added 
part-time personnel for specific duties. Perhaps the most time was 
spent helping the Planning Board and other land use boards 
develop the job description for the Director of Planning and Land- 
Use Permitting. This position replaced the previous Planning 
Director position. The Chairman had the privilege of participating 
in the interviews for the new Director, which resulted in the hiring of 
a well-qualified candidate. 

The Board discussed the need to assist Town boards in doing 
meaningful performance reviews of their key employees. A series 
of training sessions is planned for the spring. The Board also 
continues to review the Personnel Handbook to make sure that all 
sections are up-to-date. We is very grateful for all of the excellent 
work that Anita Scheipers, Assistant Town Administrator provides 
in all these areas. 

Anyone who is interested in attending our meetings is welcome. 
Typically meetings are held in the morning on an as-needed basis 
in the Town Offices. All meetings are posted. 



54 



FINANCE 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT REPORT 
COLLEEN WILKINS, FINANCE DIRECTOR 



Town of Lincoln, Massachusetts 

Combined Balance Sheet - All Fund Types and Account Groups 

June 30, 2010 

Proprietary Fiduciary Fiduciary 
Governmental Fund Types Fund Type Fund Type General General 

Special Capital Self Insured Long Term Fixed Asset Totals 

General Revenue Pro|ects Enterprise Trust & Agency Trust Fund Debt Group Account Group (Memo Only) 



$7,8 



3,724 
900 



510,676 

(225,369) 

94,963 

6,502 



Assets 
Cash/Investments 

Petty Cash 
Receivables: 

Property Taxes 

Allowance for Abatements and Exempt 

Excises 

Tax Liens 

Tax Possession 

Subdivision Bond -40 Deerhaven 

User Charges, Net of Allowance 

for Uncollectible 

Due from Other Governments 
Fixed Assets, Net of Depreciation 
Land 

Accum Depr Plant 
Machinery & Equip 
Accum Depr Machinery & Equip 



$3,940,887 $3,865,503 $1,436,134 



11,190,126 

750,000 

(3,317,796) 

(184,165) 






20,710,554 

$1,845 

$85,397 

$517,647 

($225,369) 

$94,963 

$6,700 

$33,133 

$25,000 

$0 



Amount to be Provided for Payment of Bonds 






$12,125 

65,065,816 $76,255,943 

$750,000 

($3,317,796) 

(16,104,840) ($16,289,005) 

$0 

7,470,000 $7,470,000 



Total Assets 



$8,299,528 $3,961,127 $3,865,503 $9,959,697 $2,905,476 $708,830 $7,470,000 $48,960,977 $86,131,137 



Liabilities and Fund Equity 
Liabilities: 

Warrants Payable 529,078 

Accrued Payroll $577,080 



$140,050 
356,117 



Withholding Payable 

Unclaimed Items 

Due to Proprietary Funds 

Due to Other Governments 

Bonds Payable 

BANS 

Guarantee Deposits 
Other Liabilities (IBNR) 
Deferred Revenue: 

Def Rev Intergovernmental 

Property Taxes 

Property Tax Accruals 

Excises 

Tax Possessions 

Tax Liens 



140,889 



393 
333 



$56,504 
8,580 



2,853,915 



$5,840 
3,905 



i 

. 12,125 IT 
214,838 6,972 






94,963 
33,133 
6,502 



Total Liabilities 



1,642,747 



Fund Equity: 

Invested in Capital Assets, Net 

Retained Earnings: 
Reserved for Encumbrances 
Unreserved Retained Earnings 

Fund Balances: 
Reserved for Endowments 
Reserved for Encumbrances 
Reserved for Expenditure 
Reserved for Snow & Ice 
Reserved for CPA purposes 
Reserved for Debt Service 

Unreserved Fund Balance: 
Designated 
Undesignated 



731,472 
945,682 
140,889 
20,612 



10,323,915 
2,168,000 
25,000 
319,323 
85,397 
12,125 
221,810 

94,963 
33,133 
6,700 



515,535 2,168,000 3,004,396 



319,323 7,470,000 



216,563 
1,069,485 



476,436 
2,475,675 



413,897 
365,796 



386,075 
3,667,864 2,144,251 



2,443 
1,695,060 






48,960,977 54,545,229 



216,563 

1,069,485 





890,633 

2,926,471 



135,574 

36,805 



388,518 

10,792,113 



Total Fund Equity 



6,656,781 3,445,593 1,697,503 6,955,301 



48,960,977 71,001,391 



Total Liabilities and Fund Equity $8,299,528 $3,961,127 $3,865,503 



$2,905,476 $708,830 $7,470,000 $48,960,977 $86,131,137 



55 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT 
MARY C. DAY, COLLECTOR 



Balance 
6/30/2009 



Commitments/ 
New Charges 



Abatements/ 
Credits 



Payments 
Received 




Balance 
6/30/2010 



REAL ESTATE TAXES 

Tax Title Accounts 
Taxes in Deferral 

2007 Real Estate 

2008 Real Estate 

2009 Real Estate 

2010 Real Estate 

Real Estate Possession 



19,836.41 

218,302.86 

82.58 

88.98 

291,826.15 

33,133.00 



142,605.68 
69,139.03 



126,412.46 
128,029.89 



158,243.06 
57,650.86 



165,546.29 
20,823,710.37 85,590.08 



COM M UNITY PRESERVATION ACT 

2008 CPA 

2009 CPA 

2010 CPA 
Tax Title CPA 



7,465.43 
364.52 



562,633.38 
3,691.34 



(88.98) 
3,475.21 
2,244.31 
(125.00) 



3,990.22 

555,090.48 

3,982.78 



4,199.03 

229,791.03 

82.58 

(0.00) 

(132.60) 

272,551.44 

33,133.00 



TOTAL REAL ESTATE $ 


563,269.98 


$21,350,446.33 


$ 254,531.33 


$ 21,205,150.58 


$ 85,590.08 


$ 539,624.48 


















PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 














2000 Personal Property 


866.20 










866.20 


2001 Personal Property 


1,047.69 










1,047.69 


2002 Personal Property 


1,103.59 










1,103.59 




2003 Personal Property 


372.58 










372.58 




2004 Personal Property 


2,010.04 










2,010.04 




2005 Personal Property 

2006 Personal Property 


1,618.64 
(0.00) 










1,618.64 
(0.00) 




2007 Personal Property 


398.81 










398.81 




2008 Personal Property 


179.75 










179.75 


2009 Personal Property 


381.74 






339.90 




41.84 


2010 Personal Property 




366,096.70 


7,359.24 


357,993.45 




744.01 


TOTAL PERSONAL PROPERTY $ 


7,979.04 


$ 366,096.70 


$ 7,359.24 


$ 358,333.35 


$ 


$ 8,383.15 
















M OTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE 












7,875.12 


2000 Excise 


7,875.12 




2001 Excise 


8,242.82 










8,242.82 


2002 Excise 


6,602.93 










6,602.93 
6,038.26 


2003 Excise 


6,075.14 






36.88 


2004 Excise 


6,247.82 






88.75 




6,159.07 


2005 Excise 


5,353.46 




361.25 


858.27 




4,133.94 


2006 Excise 


4,429.70 




773.86 
235.10 


60.00 
460.21 


796.36 
71.35 


4,392.20 
6,403.88 


2007 Excise 


7,027.84 


2008 Excise 


13,792.91 


1,549.79 


2,758.16 


8,359.90 


2,25179 


6,476.43 


2009 Excise 


27,284.47 


109,092.82 


16,346.05 


114,189.28 


7,164.63 


13,006.59 


2010 Excise 




708,148.23 


21,909.29 


662,931.78 


2,324.39 


25,631.55 


TOTAL EXCISE $ 


92,932.21 


$ 818,790.84 


$ 42,383.71 


$ 786,985.07 


$ 12,608.52 


$ 94,962.79 


WATER USAGE CHARGES 

Total Water Commitments 


99,062.11 


897,237.01 


34,521.89 


879,159.73 


2,779.89 


85,397.39 


Water Liens Added to Tax 


746.47 


32,539.99 


746.47 


33,427.92 


3,191.24 


2,303.31 


Water Liens Added to Tax Ttle 




746.47 




746.47 






TOTAL WATER $ 


99,808.58 


$ 930,523.47 


$ 35,268.36 


$ 913,334.12 


$ 5,971.13 


$ 87,700.70 



(0.00) 

0.00 

6,971.50 

198.08 



TOTAL CPA 


$ 


7,740.97 


$ 566,324.72 


$ 


5,505.54 


$ 563,063.48 


$ 


1,672.91 


$ 


7,169.58 




GRAND TOTALS: 


$ 


771,730.78 


$24,032,182.06 


$ 


345,048.18 


$ 23,826,866.60 


$ 


105,842.64 


$ 


737,840.70 





MISC. OTHER COLLECTIONS 



Receipts 



Interest on R.E. Taxes 
Interest on P.P. Taxes 
Interest on Tax Title/ Deferred Accts 
Interest on Mot. Veh. Excise 
Interest on CPA Surcharge 
Late Charge on Water 
Demand & Warrant Fees 
License Marking Fees 
Municipal Lien Cert. Fees 



38,461.54 
114.99 
13,150.32 
4,612.92 
978.31 
2,220.00 
6,860.10 
1,800.00 
5,000.00 



TOTAL 



73,198.18 



56 





TREASURER'S REPORT 




MARY C. DAY, TOWN TREASURER 








CASH BALANCES AS OF JUNE 30, 2010 


. 






General Town Funds 




Cash on Deposit 


Citizen's Bank 




. 


Depository Account 




1,319,531.66 


Vendor Account 




36,703.94 


Payroll Account 




14,766.04 


Hanscom Account 




1,394,691.60 


Justice Drug Fund 


2,119.59 


State Drug Fund 




3,626.49 


Recreation Revolving Account 


96,078.67 


Student Activity Agency Funds 
Escrow Account 


60,064.86 
105,820.30 


Community Preservation Act Fund 


797,189.84 


Self-Insurance Fund 


708,984.56 


Cultural Council 


994.14 


Century Bank 




Certificate of Deposit 


519,392.71 


UniBank 




Lockbox Account 


12,607.73 


Remote Capture 
ACH Transfers 


127,777.10 
289,345.53 


Certificate of Deposit 


1,004,420.41 


Cambridge Trust Company 




Depository Account 


4,400,381.17 


School Lunch Revolving Fund 


73,901.55 


Road Construction Account 


2,282,875.09 


Police Narcotics Fund 


370.00 


Commonwealth Financial 






OPEB Funds 




495,937.21 


Rollstone Bank 

Depository Account 


4,003,178.08 


Mass. Municipal Depository Trust 


(pooled investment) 




General Town Account 




309,097.69 


Community Preservation Act Fund 


646,862.00 


Affordable Housing 
Petty Cash (located in various offices) 


855,106.25 
1,845.00 


General Town Funds - Total 


$19,563,669.21 






Trust Funds 


Market Value 






Commonwealth Financial Network 






Various Investments 

Cash/Cash Equivalents 




95,350.11 
385,465.87 


Equities 


Fixed Income 


217,303.20 


Mutual Funds 

..... 


451,854.93 


Trust Funds - Totals 


$1,149,974.11 






TOTAL CASH BALANCE (06/30/' 


0) 


$20,713,643.32 


(General Town Funds Total 


+ Trust Funds Total) 



57 



STATEMENT OF OUTSTANDING DEBT 
AS OF JUNE 30, 2010 



State House Loan Note (4.90%) - For Remodeling of Codman Pool 

Issued May 1, 2003 under Ch. 645 of the Acts of 1948 as amended and 

MDted at annual town meeting on March 26, 2002; and Ch. 44, Sec. 7 of the Mass. 

General Laws. 






OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL 



$60,000.00 



REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 





DUE DATE 


PRINCIPAL DUE INTEREST DUE 






5/1/2011 


20,000.00 2,940.00 






5/1/2012 


20,000.00 1,960.00 






5/1/2013 


20,000.00 980.00 


TOTAL 


60,000.00 5,880.00 


General Obligation Bond (3.249494%) - For Remodeling of Bemis Hall & purchase of a 



Fire Truck 

Issued August 15, 2004 under Ch. 645 of the Acts of 1948 as amended and 
\£>ted at annual town meeting on March 23, 2002 for the remodeling of Bemis Hall 
and March 27, 2004 for the purchase of a fire truck; and Ch. 44, Sec. 7 of the Mass. 
General Laws 

OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL $400,000.00 



REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 



DUE DATE 

8/15/2010 
2/15/2011 
8/15/2011 
2/15/2012 
8/15/2012 
2/15/2013 
8/15/2013 
2/15/2014 
8/15/2014 



PRINCIPAL DUE 

80,000.00 



80,000.00 



80,000.00 



80,000.00 



80,000.00 



INTEREST DUE 

6,940.00 
5,740.00 
5,740.00 
4,480.00 
4,480.00 
3,080.00 
3,080.00 
1,600.00 
1,600.00 



TOTAL 



400,000.00 



36,740.00 



58 



General Obligation Bond (3.190372%) - For Affordable Housing 

Issued June 15, 2008 under Ch. 44 Section 7 (3 & 3A) and Ch. 44B Section 1 1 and 

as amended and voted at annual town meeting on April 2, 2005 



OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL 



$340,000.00 



REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 




DUE DATE 

12/15/2010 

6/15/2011 

12/15/2011 

6/15/2012 

12/15/2012 

6/15/2013 

12/15/2013 

6/15/2014 

12/15/2014 

6/15/2015 

12/15/2015 

6/15/2016 

12/15/2016 

6/15/2017 

12/15/2017 

6/15/2018 



PRINCIPAL DUE 






45,000.00 



45,000.00 



45,000.00 



45,000.00 



40,000.00 



40,000.00 



40,000.00 



40,000.00 



INTEREST DUE 

5,562.50 
5,562.50 
4,887.50 
4,887.50 
4,212.50 
4,212.50 
3,481.25 
3,481.25 
2,750.00 
2,750.00 
2,100.00 
2,100.00 
1,400.00 
1,400.00 
700.00 
700.00 






TOTAL 



340,000.00 



50,187.50 



General Obligation Bond (3.190372%) - For Land Acquisition 

Issued June 15, 2008 under Ch. 44 Section 7(3) and Ch. 44B Section 11 and 

voted at annual town meeting on April 2, 2005 



OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL $260,000.00 



REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 
DUE DATE PRINCIPAL DUE 






tt- 



12/15/2010 

6/15/2011 

12/15/2011 

6/15/2012 

12/15/2012 

6/15/2013 

12/15/2013 

6/15/2014 

12/15/2014 

6/15/2015 

12/15/2015 

6/15/2016 

12/15/2016 

6/15/2017 

12/15/2017 

6/15/2018 






35,000.00 
35,000.00 
35,000.00 
35,000.00 
30,000.00 
30,000.00 
30,000.00 
30,000.00 



INTEREST DUE 

4,250.00 
4,250.00 
3,725.00 
3,725.00 
3,200.00 
3,200.00 
2,631.25 
2,631.25 
2,062.50 
2,062.50 
1,575.00 
1,575.00 
1,050.00 
1,050.00 
525.00 
525.00 



TOTAL 



260,000.00 



38,037.50 



59 



General Obligation Bond (3.190372%) - For Library Roof Replacement 

Issued June 15, 2008 under Ch. 44 Section 7 (3A) and Ch. 44 B Section 11 and 

as amended and \£>ted at annual town meeting on April 2, 2005 



OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL 



$190,000.00 



REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 



DUE DATE 

12/15/2010 

6/15/2011 

12/15/2011 

6/15/2012 

12/15/2012 

6/15/2013 

12/15/2013 






PRINCIPAL DUE 

25,000.00 
25,000.00 
25,000.00 





6/15/2014 




25,000.00 


1,950.00 




12/15/2014 




25,000.00 


1,543.75 
1,543.75 




6/15/2015 




12/15/2015 






1,137.50 



6/15/2016 
12/15/2016 
6/15/2017 
12/15/2017 
6/15/2018 



25,000.00 



20,000.00 



20,000.00 



INTEREST DUE 

3,106.25 
3,106.25 
2,731.25 
2,731.25 
2,356.25 
2,356.25 
1,950.00 
1,950.00 
1,543.75 
1,543.75 
1,137.50 
1,137.50 
700.00 
700.00 
350.00 
350.00 



TOTAL 



190,000.00 



27,750.00 



General Obligation Bond (3.190372%) - For purchase of a Firetruck 
Issued June 15, 2008 under Ch. 44 Section 7(9) and as amended 
and \£>ted at annual town meeting on March 24, 2007 





OUTS 


TANDING PRINCIPAL 


$360,000.00 


1 








REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 






DUE DATE 


PRINCIPAL DUE 


INTEREST DUE 




12/15/2010 
6/15/2011 
12/15/2011 
6/15/2012 


T 


45,000.00 
45,000.00 


5,906.25 
5,906.25 
5,231.25 
5,231.25 




12/15/2012 






4,556.25 




6/15/2013 






45,000.00 


4,556.25 




12/15/2013 










3,825.00 




6/15/2014 








45,000.00 


3,825.00 


12/15/2014 








3,093.75 




6/15/2015 






45,000.00 


3,093.75 
2,362.50 




12/15/2015 
6/15/2016 










.< 




45,000.00 


2,362.50 
1,575.00 




12/15/2016 


.:_ r 






6/15/2017 




45,000.00 


1,575.00 




12/15/2017 
6/15/2018 






787.50 






45,000.00 


787.50 


TOTAL 




360,000.00 


54,675.00 



60 



General Obligation Bond (3.190372%) - For purchase of a Firetruck 


Issued June 15, 2008 under Ch. 44 Section 7(9) and as amended 




and voted at annual town meeting on March 24, 2007 




OUTSTA 


NDING PRINCIPAL $160,000.00 


. 






REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 




DUE DATE PRINCIPAL DUE 


INTEREST DUE 


12/15/2010 


2,625.00 


6/15/2011 20,000.00 


2,625.00 


12/15/2011 


2,325.00 
2,325.00 


6/15/2012 


20,000.00 


12/15/2012 




2,025.00 
2,025.00 


6/15/2013 


20,000.00 


12/15/2013 




1,700.00 
1,700.00 


6/15/2014 


20,000.00 


12/15/2014 


1,375.00 


6/15/2015 


20,000.00 


1,375.00 


12/15/2015 




1,050.00 


6/15/2016 20,000.00 


1,050.00 


12/15/2016 




700.00 


6/15/2017 
12/15/2017 


20,000.00 


CO CO ^1 

en en o 
o o p 
bob 
o o o 


6/15/2018 20,000.00 


TOTAL 160,000.00 


24,300.00 



General Obligation Bond (2.206555%) - For purchase of an Ambulance 
Issued May 1, 2010 under Ch. 44 Section 7(9) and as amended 
and voted at annual town meeting on March 27, 2010 (Article 10) and 
March 29, 2010 (Question 4). 









OUTSTA 


NDING PRINCIPAL 


$200,000.00 












REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 




DUE DATE 


PRINCIPAL DUE INTEREST DUE 




11/1/2010 


2,200.00 




5/1/2011 40,000.00 2,200.00 




11/1/2011 1,800.00 




5/1/2012 40,000.00 1,800.00 




11/1/2012 


1,400.00 


5/1/2013 


40,000.00 1,400.00 




11/1/2013 


1,000.00 




5/1/2014 




40,000.00 


1,000.00 
500.00 




11/1/2014 








5/1/2015 




40,000.00 500.00 


TOTAL 




200,000.00 


13,800.00 



61 



General Obligation Bond (2.206555%) - For road improvements 
Issued May 1, 2010 under Ch. 44 Section 7(5) and as amended 
and voted at annual town meeting on March 29, 20008 and March 31, 



2008 



Article 21, Question 1 



OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL $5,500,000.00 



REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 



DUE DATE 

11/1/2010 

5/1/2011 
11/1/2011 

5/1/2012 
11/1/2012 

5/1/2013 
11/1/2013 

5/1/2014 
11/1/2014 

5/1/2015 
11/1/2015 

5/1/2016 
11/1/2016 

5/1/2017 
11/1/2017 

5/1/2018 
11/1/2018 

5/1/2019 
11/1/2019 

5/1/2020 



PRINCIPAL DUE 






1 



595,000.00 
595,000.00 



595,000.00 
595,000.00 
595,000.00 
595,000.00 
595,000.00 
595,000.00 
590,000.00 
150,000.00 



INTEREST DUE 

70,600.00 
70,600.00 
64,650.00 
64,650.00 
58,700.00 
58,700.00 
52,750.00 
52,750.00 
45,312.50 
45,312.50 
37,875.00 
37,875.00 
28,950.00 
28,950.00 
20,025.00 
20,025.00 
11,100.00 
11,100.00 
2,250.00 
2,250.00 



TOTAL 



5,500,000.00 



784,425.00 



62 






Bond Anticipation Note (0.5424%) - For Land Acquisition 

Dated May 11, 2010, Payable May 11, 2011. This BAN is in anticipation of the sale 
of $793,000 Land Acquisition Bonds authorized under GL Ch. 44, Section 7(3), a vote 
of the Town passed on March 27, 2010 (Article 12) and March 29, 2010 (Question 2). 

J [ JT 

OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL $793,000.00 

REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 






DUE DATE PRINCIPAL DUE INTEREST DUE 

5/11/2011 793,000.00 9,912.50 



TOTAL 793,000.00 9,912.50 



Bond Anticipation Note (0.5424%) - For Computer Hardware and Software 
Dated May 11, 2010, Payable May 11, 2011. This BAN is in anticipation of the sale 
of $725,000 Computer Hardware & Software Bonds authorized under GL Ch. 44, 
Section 7(28) and 7(29) and a vote of the Town passed on March 27, 2010 (Article 11) 
and March 29, 2010 (Question 1) 



T< 



OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL $725,000.00 

REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 
DUE DATE PRINCIPAL DUE INTEREST DUE 

5/11/2011 725,000.00 9,062.50 

TOTAL 725,000.00 9,062.50 



Bond Anticipation Note (0.5424%) - For K-8 Feasibility Study 

Dated May 11, 2010, Payable May 11, 2011. This BAN is in anticipation of the sale 

of $650,000 K-8 Feasibility Study Bonds authorized under GL Ch. 44, Section 7(21) 

and 7(22) and a vote of the Town passed on March 27, 2010 (Article 13) and March 29, 201 



(Question 3). 






OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL $650,000.00 




r ._.. . 

REMAINING REPAYMENT SCHEDULE 




DUE DATE PRINCIPAL DUE 


INTEREST DUE 


5/11/2011 650,000.00 
TOTAL 650,000.00 


8,125.00 
8,125.00 



63 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Douglas Harding 
Peter Hodges 
Donald Collins, Chair 

As I review investment returns for the past year I am filled with gratitude and 
relief. The financial markets have recovered significantly from the depths of the 
financial crises and the Town's portfolio has benefited, recently hitting all- time 
highs. I am grateful for the good returns and relieved that the worst fears of 
market strategists did not materialize. 

The past few years have been a stressful period to be responsible for 
managing money. The historic stock market crash and devastating recession 
tested the assumptions and challenged the convictions of all investors. I'm 
pleased to report that your investment committee and financial advisors were 
up to the task. We did not panic but stuck to what we believed was a well- 
conceived policy, active management of a diversified portfolio of high quality 
investments. 

While we are pleased with the results of recent years we are well aware that a 
great many problems remain. The financial markets have rallied back, which is 
good, but the higher levels also mean that there are not as many great 
opportunities to choose from. While we hope to achieve positive returns in the 
future we would not expect them to be as high as in recent years. We will 
continue to do our best however, to take advantage of the opportunities that 
present themselves while being careful to stay within our risk parameters. 
Hopefully, the good judgment and common sense that helped us weather past 
crises will continue to serve us in this recovery period. 



64 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS REPORT 
2009-2010 






6/30/2009 
BALANCE 



REVENUE 



EXPENSES 



6/30/2010 
BALANCE 



PRINCIPAL* 



Library Funds 

Katherine S. Bolt Fund 
John W. & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 
Codman Fund 
Virginia S. Dillman Fund 
Mary Jane & Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 
Alice D. Hart & Olive B. Floyd Fund 
Gleason Fund 
Herschbach Fund 
Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 
Lincoln Library Fund 
Dorothy Moore Fund 
John H. Pierce Fund 
George Russell Fund 
Edith Winter Sperber Fund 
Abbie J. Steams Fund 
Joseph & Henri-Ann Sussman Fund 
George G. Tarbell Fund 
George C. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
West Abrashkin Fund 
C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
Library Funds -TOTAL 



$ 1. 

39,616. 

1,022. 

5,525. 

922. 

998. 

28,983. 

5,994. 

2,389. 

957. 

6,640. 

780. 

1,116. 

0. 

1,991. 



93 $ 

50 

70 

50 

73 

52 

84 

90 

78 

93 

52 

41 

40 

01 

32 






9,296. 
5,268. 
10,760. 
1,013. 
1,303. 
124,585. 



0.27 
5,740.96 
148.20 
800.72 
133.72 
144.70 
4,200.14 
868.72 
346.31 
138.82 
962.28 
113.08 
161.79 

288.55 
1,347.18 

763.52 
1,559.29 

146.91 

188.91 
18,054.07 






2.20 

45,357.46 

1,170.90 

6,326.22 

1,056.45 

1,143.22 

33,183.98 

6,863.62 

2,736.09 

1,096.75 

D2.80 

33.49 

78.19 

0.01 

2,279.87 

10,643.70 

6,032.34 

12,319.48 

1,160.72 

1,492.48 

142,639.97 



30,652.50 
1,000.00 
5,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 

30,000.00 
5,025.00 
2,206.26 
1,000.00 



7,602.80 


5,000.00 


893.49 


869.21 


1,278.19 


1,000.00 



1,500.00 
9,400.00 
4,000.00 
11,875.62 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
112,528.59 



Miscellaneous Funds 

Bemis Lecture Fund 
Betty Bjork Prof Dev Fund 
Alfred Callahan Fund 
Codman Scholarship Fund 
DeCordova School Equipment Fund 
Donald Gordon Recreation Fund 
Joseph Brooks Grammar School Fund 



23,561. 
13,997. 

2,790. 
97,443. 
26,883. 

9,306. 

1,314. 



3,414.29 

3,072.93 

404.39 

60,137.79 

3,895.74 

1,348.60 

190.44 



$ 



8,000.00 



26,975.35 
17,070.34 

3,194.91 

149,581.58 

30,779.10 

10,654.88 

1,504.60 



27,430.41 

17,505.00 

3,015.93 

145,500.00 

28,961.02 

5,256.07 

1,217.27 



Lawrence H. Green Fund 


3,303.70 


478.74 




3,782.44 


1,307.65 


Norman Hapgood Fund 


250.53 


36.31 




286.84 


286.17 


Christine Patterson Fund 


9,929.81 


1,438.95 




11,368.76 


11,064.77 


John H. Pierce Legacy Fund 


140,106.57 


30,738.99 




170,845.56 


115,000.00 


Jane Hamilton Poor Scholarship Fund 


5,747.33 


832.86 
41,250.42 


17,792.66 


6,580.19 
251,235.13 


1,235.00 


Lincoln Scholarship Fund 


227,777.37 


180,148.50 


Abbie J. Stearns Fund for the Silent Poor 


2,574.06 


695.63 


986.28 


2,283.41 


1,500.00 


John Todd Fund 


32,508.37 


4,720.22 


178.01 


37,050.58 


30,000.00 


Tricentennial Fund 
Miscellaneous Funds - TOTAL 


5,902.80 
$ 603,397.12 $ 


855.39 
153,511.69 $ 


26,956.95 $ 


6,758.19 
729,951.86 $ 


6,912.15 
576,339.94 



Special Funds 












Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 


$ 175,306.76 


$ 39,748.90 


$ 14,540.00 


$ 200,515.66 


$ 152,500.45 


Conservation Fund 


70,946.48 


10,594.20 


4,673.45 


76,867.23 


- 


Special Funds - TOTAL 


246,253.24 


50,343.10 


19,213.45 


277,382.89 


152,500.45 



All Funds -TOTAL 



$ 974,236.26 $ 221,908.86 $ 46,170.40 $1,149,974.72 $ 841,368.98 



*NOTE: Principal represents the portion of the Fund Balance which cannot be spent. 



65 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Ellen Meadors 
John G. Robinson 
Edward Morgan, Chair 

Staff - Our Administrator, Patrice Brennan is the helpful person most people 
see in the Assessors' office. To provide additional assessing services we have 
a contract with Regional Resources Group, Inc.. George Bourgault, an 
employee of RRG, is in the office two days a week and Harald Scheid, 
President of RRG, is in the office two mornings a week. 

Housing Values - Sales in calendar year 2009 (the basis for the FY 201 1 
values) showed that prices fell about 3 percent on average from the previous 
year. 

Split Tax Rate - As in the past several years, the Selectmen approved a split 
tax rate that increases the proportion of taxes paid by the owners of 
commercial properties. For fiscal year 2011, the tax rate was set at $12.37 per 
$1,000 for residential property and at $16.27 per $1,000 for non-residential 
property. 

Property Tax Deferrals and Exemptions - Lincoln's property tax deferral 
program allows seniors 60 years or older with income below $60,000 to defer 
all or part of their annual property taxes. Deferred property taxes and interest at 
4% are repaid to the Town when the owner dies or sells the home. Seven 
property owners took advantage of the property tax deferral in fiscal year 201 1 . 
Please call the office at any time of the year to receive an application or consult 
with office staff about the various exemption and deferral programs. 

Re-inspections - Each year the Assessors conduct re-inspections of about 
one-fifth of Lincoln properties. The re-inspection consists of measurement of 
the outside of the house and a quick walk-through of the inside to verify that 
the data on the Property Record Card is correct. This process helps keep 
valuations accurate and up to date. You will receive notification in the mail if 
your property is planned for re-inspection. 

Assessments - A list of fiscal year 2011 assessed values is available on the 
Town website at http.V/www.lincolntown.org/depts/boa.htm or by calling our 
office at 781-259-2611. 

In addition, Property Record Cards are available online on the Town GIS 
website at www.caigisonline.com/LincolnMA . Please review your Property 
Record Card and let us know if you find any inaccuracies. 



66 



Board of Assessors 
Recap of Fiscal Year 2011 



Valuation 



Taxable Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Exempt Property 
TOTAL 






Appropriations and Assessments 



$1,837,739,345 

25,503,720 

410,998,504 

$2,274,241,569 



Tow n Appropriations 

State and County Charges 

Overlay 

Other Amounts to be Raised 

TOTAL 






Estimated Receipts 



Roperty Tax Revenues 
Cherry Sheet Receipts 
Local Estimated Receipts 
Enterprise Funds - Water Dept. 
Community Preservation Funds 
Free Cash 

Other Available Funds 
TOTAL 



$32,296,891.28 

184,303.00 

97,735.35 

454,341.50 



$33,033,271.13 












$23,323,148.17 
$1,620,896.00 
2,094,890.82 
1,210,999.00 
2,104,680.00 
2,475,675.00 
202,982.14 



Property Tax Valuations and Revenues 






$33,033,271.13 



, 






Residential 
Commercial 



Industrial 

Personal Property 
TOTAL 



Valuation 

1,792,773,459 

42,140,890 

2,824,996 

25,503,720 



TaxRate/$1,000 

12.37 
16.27 
16.27 
16.27 



Levy 

22,176,607 

685,632 

45,962 

414,945 

23,323,148 




Real Estate 
Personal Roperty 
Exempt Roperty 



67 



CAPITAL PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Gary Taylor, Selectmen Representative 

Sanj Kharbanda, Finance Committee Representative 

Jim Henderson, Conservation Commission Representative 

Jacqueline Apsler, Library Trustee Representative 

Andy Beard, Citizen Member 

Ralph Derbyshire, Citizen Member 

Anita Scheipers, Assistant Town Administrator- Member Ex-officio 

Al Schmertzler, Chair, School Committee Representative 

The Capital Planning Committee's role as an advisory body is to study proposed capital 
requests for equipment or facility and infrastructure construction or improvements 
requiring major one-time expenses of at least $15,000, with an anticipated useful life of 
at least five years. The Committee membership includes representatives from several 
of the major town boards, as well as two "At-large" members to allow for effective and 
objective discussion of each request. The Committee works with funding guidelines 
issued by the Finance Committee at the start of the budget planning process. The 
amount recommended for funding FY12 capital and maintenance projects was a totai of 
$625,000. This limit does not apply to those items which are proposed to be bonded, 
most of which occurs as debt exclusion votes (outside of Proposition 2 V 2 ). 

The Capital Planning Committee received Capital requests for cash purchases of 
equipment or facility improvement projects totaling $688,000, for building and 
equipment maintenance requests totaling $228,000 and large bondable project requests 
totaling $7,300,000. The committee worked carefully to review all requests and to 
develop priorities of which requests to fund, which items would best be presented to the 
voters as items to bond rather than appropriate funds for cash purchases, and those 
items that would be presented as separate warrant articles. 

The Committee determined that several items being requested as cash capital items 
were best to be delayed for a future fiscal year, and were not recommended to be 
included in the FY12 capital funding. The routine annual maintenance articles for the 
town buildings, school buildings and library were approved with minor cost adjustments, 
and were joined by a new annual article for maintenance of the town IT infrastructure to 
ensure the town carries on with proper maintenance of our technology systems. As of 
the writing of this report, three projects are still being considered for recommendation as 
bonded projects for which the payments of the associated principle and interest will be 
funded outside of our Proposition 2 Y 2 limits if approved by the voters. These projects 
include the town offices renovation project and the completion of the Library's fire 
suppression system. Once the Capital Committee obtains final information on these 
requests, they will vote as to whether to recommend they be considered at town 
meeting. The Finance Committee will determine the appropriate method of funding to 
propose for approval by the voters. 

All requests (whether approved, denied or pending) are listed in the following 
spreadsheet. This sheet indicates the level of funding recommended, as well as the 
Committee's recommendation as to the source of funding to be considered. These 
recommendations are presented to the Selectmen and Finance Committee to place 
before the voters at the 2008 annual town meeting. 

68 



DEPARTMENT 


FY12 


Approved 

Cash Capital 

Items 


Approved 

Maintenance 

Items 


Possible Bonded 
Items 












Road Pavine Phase 2 


$664,000.00 






Reduced. 

Exact amount 

TBD. 


Wood Chipper 


$45,000.00 


$45,000 






Leaf Vac 


$20,000.00 


$20,000 






Utility Trk w Plow 


$51,000.00 








DPW Sub-total 


$780,000.00 


















FIRE DEPARTMENT 




















Brush Truck 


$43,000.00 


$43,000 






Fire Dept. Sub-total 


$43,000.00 


















POLICE DEPARTMENT 




















Cruiser Replacement ( 2 cruisers) 


$66,000.00 


$66,000 






Motor Cycle 


$25,000.00 








Police Sub-total 


$91,000.00 


















COMMUNICATIONS 










Radio Receiver 


$12,000.00 


$12,000 






Comm. Sub-total 


$12,000.00 


















INFORMATION TECH. 




















PC/Server Replacements (maintenance 


$67,500.00 




$59,500 




IT Sub-total 


$67,500.00 


















LIBRARY 






$28,000 














Fire Suppression System - Phase 2 


$627,662.00 






TBD 


Library Sub-total 


$627,662.00 


















SCHOOLS 




















Annual Classroom Rehab (maintenance 


$75,000.00 




$50,000 




Hartwell Skylight flashing 


$21,500.00 


$21,000 






Hartwell Asbestos Abatement - final ph 


ise $53,000.00 


$50,000 






Hartwell Unit ventilators - final phase 


$72,000.00 








Schools Sub-total 


$221,500.00 


















TOWN OFFICES 






$65,500 




Town Offices Project 


$6,000,000.00 






TBD 


Phones 


$60,000.00 








Codman Barns painting 


$58,000.00 


$55,000 






Town Offices Sub-tota 


$6,118,000.00 


















CEMETERY 










Monument Repairs 


$45,000.00 


$10,000 






Cemetery Sub-total 


$45,000.00 


















COA 










Senior Center Feasibility Study 


$45,000.00 


$45,000 






COA Sub-total 


$45,000.00 


















Recreation 










Public Restrooms 


$55,000.00 


$55,000 






Recreation Sub-total 


$55,000.00 


















ANNUAL TOTALS 


$8,105,662.00 


$422,000 


$203,000 


TBD 



69 



COMMUNITY PRESERVATION COMMITTEE 

Craig Donaldson 
Chris Fasciano 
Renel Fredriksen 
Lucretia Giese 
John Valpey 
Peter von Mertens 
Bryce Wolf 
Bill Stason, Chair 

The mandate of the Community Preservation Committee is to study the needs 
of the Town in consultation with other municipal boards and committees; to 
solicit inputs from as to the Town's community preservation needs, 
possibilities, and resources; and to make recommendations to the Town for 
expenditures in four areas of community interest: open space, preservation of 
historic structures, community housing (defined as low to moderate income 
housing), and recreation. 

The table below summarizes appropriations and expenditures by the Town for 
projects funded using CPA funds from 2003 to through 2010. 



Town of Lincoln 


CPA Appropriations & Project Status 








Appropriation 


Paid to Date 


Balance 


Status of Project 

Complete 


Battle Rd Farm Unit 150,000 


150,000 


Bemis Hall roof replacement 


150,000 


53,850 


96,150 


In progress 


Codman Barn A restoration 


112,000 
489,097 


90,153 
489,097 


21,847 


In progress | 
Complete 


Construction of archival vault at the Library 


Consultant to update Consolidated Housing Plan 


12,000 


- 


12,000 


In progress 


Control invasive species on conservation land 


51,300 


51,280 


20 


Complete 


Funding of Affordable Housing Trust 


1,713,500 


1,713,500 


- 


Complete 


Funding of Conservation Fund 


225,585 


225,585 


- 


Complete 


Historic records archive and preservation 


19,145 


18,145 


1,000 


In progress 


Historic Town buildings needs assessment 


160,000 


31,500 


128,500 


In progress 


Inventory of Historic properties 


23,250 


10,841 


12,409 


In progress 


Model historic preservation restriction easement 


5,000 


5,000 


- 


Complete 
In progress 


Pierce House Repairs 




316,800 


262,569 


54,231 


Purchase of conservation land 




1,000,000 


1,000,000 


- 


Complete 


Harrington Row property 


350,000 




Booth property 
MacDowell property 


250,000 
400,000 












Repairs & Improvements to Lincoln Library 
Repairs to historic cemetery monument 




956,750 


622,679 


334,071 


In progress 
Complete 


4,300 


4,300 


- 


Sunnyside Lane 




792,500 
50,000 


792,500 


- 


Complete 


Tot-lot at Codman Pool 


45,191 


4,809 


In progress 


Update of Library's fire suppression system 


131,542 


123,408 


8,134 


In progress 


Admin Expenses 


17,000 


12,500 


4,500 


In progress 
In progress 


Fund debt service on borrowing for CPC proje 


;ct 


526,368 


400,501 


125,867 


GRAND TOTAL 




6,906,137 


6,102,599 


803,538 





70 



The goals of the Community Preservation Act coincide closely with Lincoln's 
Vision Statement: open space, historical legacy, economic diversity, and 
citizens' convenience. Acquiring open land that comes onto the market, 
preserving our numerous historical structures, providing affordable housing and 
ensuring adequate recreation facilities are each priorities under the CPA. To 
sustain Lincoln's vision, the committee meets with town boards and 
organizations to develop a comprehensive understanding of the town's present 
and future needs, priorities, and objectives in the areas of CPA concern. The 
committee evaluates funding proposals in light of these needs and priorities. 

CPA funding has helped create affordable housing, purchase conservation 
land, and preserve key historic properties. Each of these projects has been 
determined by the committee and other town boards to be necessary or 
advisable. They have been funded by a 3% surcharge on our property taxes, 
which was supplemented by a 100% state match until 2008. Since this time, it 
has fallen to 80%, 45%, and 35% in subsequent years. This year, the first 
round match will be 27.2% in the first round, with rounds two and three to 
follow. A proposal currently before the state legislature (SB 90) would stabilize 
the match at 75%, if it is passed. 

Even at the current level of matching, however, savings to the Town are 
substantial in purchasing key parcels of open space for conservation, the 
preservation of the town's historic buildings including Town Hall, Bemis Hall, 
the Library, the Pierce House, and the Codman Community Farms. Moreover, 
Lincoln still needs more affordable housing. As long as the state match 
continues at any level, the town can undertake these projects at a reduced 
cost. 

The committee is now reviewing proposals for funding to be considered at the 
2011 Town Meeting. In evaluating proposals, it considers the following factors: 

• consistency with Lincoln's vision, its housing, open space and 
recreation plans, and other planning documents that have received 
town-wide review and input; 

• whether the project has the support of relevant town committees or 
organizations (e.g. Conservation Commission, Recreation Committee, 
Historic Commission, Housing Commission, etc.); 

• the extent to which the project helps to preserve threatened resources 
or town-owned assets; 

• the extent to which the project serves multiple needs and populations 
or a population that is currently underserved; 

• whether the project can realistically be accomplished within the 
proposed time frame and budget; 

• the impact of a delay in initiating this project; and 

• the breadth of support for the project as indicated by additional 
fundraising through grants or private donations. 

We welcome community inputs during all stages of our process - requesting, 
examining, and reaching decisions on the proposals received. 

71 



INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

Chuck Miller - Director 

As this report is being written in January 201 1 , we will review the progress that 
has been made in FY201 1 to date in the area of information technology. 

The emphasis of the Information Technology Department continues to be to 
provide the user community, that is primarily the Town Employees, with the 
technology resources they require to excel in their jobs. We strive to introduce 
technology for a purpose, not simply for the sake of technology itself. 

Strategic Plan Implementation 

Last spring, at the Annual Town Meeting, the citizens of Lincoln embraced the 
need to upgrade the aging information architecture that was supporting our 
municipal offices. Since that time, the effort has been to design the most 
versatile operating environment to provide a solid foundation for the next 
decade. 

Months were spent meeting with various vendors to find a one who would take 
the time to listen, to understand our present challenges and who was capable 
to assist us in bringing our vision to fruition. 

Since my last report we have integrated three locations that are not part of the 
fiber-optic network, into the network via commercial internet accounts utilizing 
virtual private networks (VPN). By doing so the DPW and both Water 
Department facilities are better served by the IT Department. We have also 
deployed commercial-grade WiFi capability at the Lincoln Library and at Bemis 
Hall; providing citizens with mobile devices high speed access to the web. 

The most comprehensive effort has been server upgrades and desktop 
upgrades. The approach that we have taken is to virtualize all the servers, 
many of the applications and most of the desktops. Virtualization technology 
allows a fair degree of hardware independence for applications, thus permitting 
servers to be maintained, moved or replaced with little or no impact upon users 
and daily operations. The intense effort is made in the initial stages of the 
implementation as you lay the foundation for the network and in the end, daily 
operations are streamlined. 

As this is written, Town Offices rollout of new PCs running Windows 7 and 
Office 2010 is nearing completion. In February Public Safety should be 
completed, followed by the Library. 

In the spring, we should be poised to tackle the next generation of the Town of 
Lincoln web page. Another productive year lies ahead as we utilize technology 
to serve the citizens of Lincoln. 

72 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Chief: Kevin A. Mooney 


Officers: 


William Carlo 


Lieutenant: A. Kevin Kennedy 




Robert Gallo 
Laura Stewart 


Sergeants: Sean Kennedy 




Anthony Moran 


Richard McCarty 




David Regan 


Paul Westlund 




Robert Surette 
Ian Spencer 


Detective: Jon Wentworth 








Dispatch 


ers: Christopher Boudreau 
Ryan Farrell 


Admin. Assistant: Catherine Dubeshter 


Michael Keough 






James 


MacDonald 




Michael Ott 



In 2010, there were two (2) personnel changes within the department. In 
February, Officer Thomas Moran retired after thirty-four (34) years of service to 
the Town of Lincoln. As a result, the department hired Anthony Moran who 
was one (1) of approximately two hundred and forty (240) candidates who took 
the Lincoln/Weston Police examination. Officer Moran is currently attending 
the Basic Police Recruit Academy and is scheduled to graduate in April of 
2011. In November, Dispatcher Christopher Boudreau was hired to replace 
Dispatcher Herbert Kelly who retired earlier in the year. 

TRAFFIC MONITORING PROGRAM: This year, the department implemented 
its traffic monitoring program which consists of deploying traffic counters at 
sixty-one (61) different locations throughout the town. These counters collect 
data from each designated location over a period of seven (7) consecutive 
days. 

The department will evaluate the data once collected from each location in 
order to assist with traffic enforcement and traffic patterns. Furthermore, the 
department will notify the town should there be a need to reevaluate a speed 
zone, temporarily deploy a traffic calming device, or take other action as 
deemed necessary. 

On an annual basis, the department will provide the Town Administrator a 
report which will summarize the results of the data collected. This information 
will be maintained by the department and recorded in an excel type format. 
The report will provide information regarding the specific year collected as well 
as a report comparing the data from previous years. 

DARE PROGRAM: This year, the department continued to provide instruction 
of the D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) Program at both the 

73 



Lincoln and Hanscom Middle Schools. The program is ten (10) weeks and is 
taught to the fifth (5 th ) grade students. The curriculum focuses on the harmful 
effects of substances abuse, peer pressure, conflict resolution, and decision 
making. 

AWARDS: In November, Officer Robert Gallo (Safety Officer) received an 
award on behalf of the department from AAA in recognition that there has not 
been a pedestrian fatality in the Town for over twenty-five (25) years. 
Additionally, the department also received a Bronze Award from AAA for our 
traffic safety and education program. 

TRAINING: All members of the Department received forty (40) hours of In- 
Service Training. Additionally, selected officers received specialized training in 
the areas of: juvenile law, criminal investigations, search warrants, child abuse, 
school safety, firearms, and management. 

GRANTS 

Governor's Highway Safety: The department received $1,700.00 for such 
initiatives as "Click it or Ticket" and "Drink Drive You Loose." By under taking 
this initiative, the department was able to increase its overall traffic 
enforcement. 

Statewide Emergency Telecommunication Board: TheE-911 Communications 
Department received funding which allowed all members of the department 
(Communication & Police) to receive specialized training in such areas as: 
Domestic Violence Call Taking, Dispatch Legal Issues, and Emergency/Non- 
Emergency Call taking. 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 

The following is a summary of some of the activity by the Lincoln Police 
Department for the 2010 calendar year. 

Calls for Service 8,428 

Crimes against Person 1 1 5 

Crimes against Property 177 

Arrests 73 

Criminal Complaints 170 

Traffic Stops 2,048 

Traffic Citations 1 ,904 

Operating Under the Influence 20 

Accident Investigations 103 



Kevin A. Mooney, Chief 



74 



LINCOLN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Lincoln Fire Department strives to achieve absolute confidence from the 
community by providing residents and neighboring communities with 
professional medical emergency support and fire suppression dependability. 

Throughout the past year this Department has experienced a large housing 
complex built "The Groves," a new front line ambulance "A-1," a fully equipped 
new Car-1, the promotion of a part-time firefighter to fulltime position, LEPC 
"Local Emergency Preparedness Community" meetings, a bi-annual voluntary 
physical fitness evaluation program, a Grant awarded for the S.A.F.E. "Student 
Awareness of Fire Education" Program and the acknowledgement that Lincoln 
Fire Department has been ranked number one on Emergency Medical 
Services on a National survey. 

The Groves is a multi-building complex or "community" that offers assisted 
living resources in the main building, which is three levels, and can house 
more the 150 people, contains its own Cafe, Movie Theater, Beauty Salon, 
Library, Pool and 24/7 Staff lodging. In addition to the main building there are 
twelve grouped buildings that consist of apartments, and individual town 
houses adding another potential 150 individuals. 

Ambulance 1 is a new 2011 Ford F-450 4x4, complete with electric stretcher, 
new stair chair, new portable suction, added space for Patient care area, plus 
more compartment space for gear, tools, EMS protocols. Ambulance 2 will 
remain is service as a back-up ambulance in the case of A-1 out of service or 
out of town providing staffing ability. 

Car-1 is a 2010 Ford Expedition 4x4 that's been updated with all required 
emergency response equipment "lights, siren, radios" and is used as the 
command post during major intra-agency responses. Car-1 is able to tow the 
boat trailer, light plant, special operations, and hazmat trailers efficiently. This 
vehicle replaces the 2004 Ford explorer that had been bought used and had 
been deteriorating over the past few years. 

Lincoln Fire Department is pleased to announce the promotion of William 
MacDonald of Waltham and Dave Appleton of Wayland from per deem 
firefighter to full time position. Also promoted were Mark Mola and Ben Juhola 
from firefighter to Lieutenant positions. Newly hired per deem firefighters are 
Edward Morrissey and Thomas Fitzgerald. 

With coordinated efforts from firefighters and residents the Local Emergency 
Preparedness Committee or "LEPC" has been progressing with attendance 
and participation from residents. Together the committee has created and 
implemented an emergency plan of action to safeguard the community in the 
event of a natural disaster or terrorist attack. 



75 



Physical fitness is a major part of firefighters and most members are active and 
take full advantage of the greatly appreciated donated gym equipment. A 
physical fitness program or "Physical Aptitude Test" has been created and is 
being performed by personnel twice a year to maintain physical fitness. 

Achieved GRANTS this year would include the State funded S.A.F.E. Program 
"Student Awareness of Fire Education." This funds all public, private, and pre- 
school curriculums, as well as the community program which includes adults 
65 and older. 

An independent Medical Emergency Service survey team conducts an 
assessment on patient treatment through a voluntary questioner. Over forty 
different communities nationwide have been selected and participate. Lincoln 
has been ranked number 1 for the third straight quarter in a row. 

On behalf of the Lincoln Fire Department, I would like to thank all the Lincoln 
residents, organizations, and societies for your much appreciated support and 
valued donations. I would like to recognize the town departments, boards, and 
committees for the encouragement and cooperation over the past year. The 
foundation for the department has strengthened because of the dependability 
on the town and community supporting our efforts to safeguard the community. 

At this time I would like to acknowledge the positive enthusiasm and proficient 
abilities preformed from the fire officers and firefighters during their continued 
dedication to the department and the town. 

Arthur Cotoni, Fire Chief 



76 



Total calls for service (Fire and EMS): 1557 



Fire related activities: 

Fires: 65 

Building: 13 

Cooking: 30 

Chimney: 3 

Vehicles: 6 

Woodland: 13 

Estimated dollar loss: $1,000,000 

Hazardous conditions: 64 

This consists of: Electrical wiring problems, chemical or other 
materials spilled, natural gas leaks, carbon monoxide incidents. 

Service Calls: 82 

These calls request assistance involving: Car lockouts, animal 
problems/rescues, public assistance. 

Good intent calls: 213 

These incidents include: Odor of smoke (no fire), smoke or odor 
removal, dispatched and canceled en-route, and special type of 
incident, inspections and (assist Police). 

False Alarms: 240 

Unintentional alarms sounding, alarm system malfunction, detector 
failure. 

Lightning Strikes / Severe weather: 13 

Emergency Medical services: 474 

Patients transported: 406 



77 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Richard Colantuoni, Building Commissioner 
Robert Norton, Wiring Inspector 
John Bolli, Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Russell Dixon, Jr., Plumbing & Gas Inspector 
George Dixon, Assistant Plumbing & Gas Inspector 
Gregory Kirkland, Custodian 
Earl D. Midgley, Building Maintenance 
Elaine M. Carroll, Administrative Assistant 

On July 30 of this year, Earl Midgley retired as Building Inspector after 17 years 
of service to the Town, but still works several hours a week as the Building 

Maintenance Manager for FY11. We want to thank him for his many years of 

service to the Town. Richard Colantuoni came on board as Building 

Commissioner in August on a part time basis. The Groves in Lincoln is up and 
running as of July of this year. We also had several large houses under 
construction along with the usual additions and renovations, which have kept 
all the inspectors busy. 

Values as submitted by applicants in 2010: 

Building (Residential and Commercial) $ 9,791 ,379.00 

Plumbing (Residential and Commercial) $ 773,804.00 

Electrical (Residential and Commercial) $1 ,234,793.00 

Building permits issued in 2010: 

New Residential 5 

Additions and Remodeling 122 

Drumlin Farm New Life Center 1 

Garages and barns 7 

Decks and porches 17 

Demolitions (house) 6 

Demolitions (accessory structures) 2 

Swimming Pools 3 

Re-roofing 28 

Condo Re-roofing 2 

Tents (temporary) 45 

Signs 3 

Wood Burning Stoves 4 

Fences 6 

Cell Tower - addition to existing 3 

Solar Panels 4 

Tennis Court 1 



Building permits issued 265 

Plumbing permits issued 216 

78 



Electrical permits issued 195 



Permit Fees Collected in 2010 - Residential and Commercial 

Building $ 100,058.00 

Plumbing 17,457.00 

Electrical 46,793.00 

Re-certification Fees 280.00 

Total $164,588.00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Courtney Atkinson 



The Sealer of Weights and Measures for the Town of Lincoln is Courtney 
Atkinson, retired Building Inspector for the Town of Weston. 

In 2010, Mr. Atkinson inspected 4 service stations, 1 restaurant (Whistle Stop) 
and 1 supermarket in Town as required by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 



Service Stations 4 

Supermarkets 1 

Restaurant 1 

Sealing fees collected $968.00 



Any questions regarding weights and measures for the Town of Lincoln should 
still be directed to the Office of the Building Inspector, Telephone No. 781 - 
259-2613. 



79 



HUMAN SERVICES 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Diane Haessler, R.N. 

Arnold Weinberg, M.D. 

Frederick L. Mansfield, M.D., Chair 

On September 29 of this year, Diane Haessler passed away. The Board and 
the Town have lost a dear friend and genuine humanitarian. We acknowledge 
her 17 years of service as a member and she will be greatly missed by all. 

The Board of Health meets the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30 p.m., 
and all meetings are open to the public. Citizens wishing to be placed on the 
agenda should contact the Board of Health Office at least ten days before the 
scheduled meeting date. 

The Board's office manager is Elaine Carroll, who is also the Administrative 
Assistant for the Building Department. Inspectional services are provided 
through an inter-municipal agreement with the Town of Concord. 

The Board of Health is responsible for a variety of issues related to water 
protection, solid and hazardous waste disposal, communicable diseases, and 
public health hazards in the environment. The Board is charged with 
overseeing the onsite wastewater (septic) system program; enforcing the State 
Sanitary Code for food establishments; summer camps, swimming pools, 
beaches, private water wells, overseeing mosquito control programs; 
supporting mental health services for Lincoln residents through Eliot 
Community Human Services; organizing a flu vaccination clinic each autumn; 
and works closely with the Town appointed dog officer. 

PERMIT ACTIVITY 

In 2010, the Board of Health issued: 41 permits to construct/alter onsite 
wastewater (septic) systems, 5 Recreational Camp permits, 1 pool permit, and 
20 Food Establishment Permits, 16 catering permits and 41 temporary events 
permits. This year, agents of the Board of Health witnessed over 42 deep test 
holes and percolation tests for the siting of onsite wastewater (septic) systems. 

Two new food establishments completed construction this year - AKA Bistro at 
the Lincoln Mall and the Deaconess Groves Community Kitchen. Both of these 
establishments' construction plans were reviewed by the agents of the Board of 
Health prior to the commencement of construction. 



HEARINGS 

The Board voted to grant 14 variances to local septic regulations this year 
during its regular meetings. 

80 



OTHER ACTIVITIES 

Communicable disease 

control: All communicable 
disease reports are forwarded 
to Maureen Richichi, the 
School and Town Nurse, for 
review. Case reports 

investigated for the Board of 
Health since 2008 are 
summarized on the following 
table. 



Disease Reports 

Lyme Disease 


2008 

30 


2009 

31 


2010 

29 


Enterovirus 





1 


2 


Campylobacter 
Salmonella 


1 
4 


1 
1 


4 
1 


Cryptosporidium 
Giardia 












1 


Babesiosis 





1 





Granulocytic Anaplasmosis 
Hepatitis C 
Tuberculosis, latent 




2 


5 




1 
1 
1 


Pertussis 


1 








Dengue Fever 

Vibrio 

Streptococcal Invasive Group 







1 


1 





Streptococcal Invasive Group 
B 



ANIMAL CENSUS: The following table lists the population of farm animals 
since 2003. 



Type 


2003 


2004 


2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


2010 


Cattle, dairy 


5 


11 


2 


7 


9 


6 


9 


7 


Cattle, beef 


52 


59 


59 


46 


49 


76 


41 


48 


Cattle, steer/oxen 


5 


6 


2 








11 


13 


8 


Cattle, yearlings 


26 





35 


29 


7 





32 


15 


Goats 


23 


26 


16 


13 


18 


24 


25 


21 


Sheep 


145 


130 


137 


123 


112 


116 


84 


100 


Swine 


18 


15 


11 


16 


16 


15 


15 


16 


Horses/Ponies 


84 


89 


90 


83 


87 


96 


86 


84 


Llamas/Alpacas 


2 


2 


2 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


Donkeys 


2 





1 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


Chickens 


790 


856 


827 


676 


622 


490 


636 


530 


Turkeys 


19 


25 


15 


18 


12 


15 





4 


Waterfowl 


46 


54 


49 


72 


54 


60 


33 


31 


Game Birds 


11 


10 


11 








10 


9 


12 


Guinea Hens 








8 





4 


9 





10 


Water Buffalo 




















1 


1 


Pigeons 




















9 


6 


Rabbits 


10 





21 

81 


16 


26 


20 


2 


6 



DOG OFFICER 






MONTH 



TOTAL # CALLS 
RECEIVED 



TOTAL* DOGS 
IMPOUNDED 



TOTAL* DOGS NOT 
CLAIMED 



TOTAL* HUMAN BITE 
CALLS 



JANUARY 

FEBRUARY 

MARCH 

APRIL 

MAY 

JUNE 

JULY 

AUGUST 

SEPTEMBER 

OCTOBER 

NOVEMBER 
DECEMBER 



20 
9 



17 



15 



12 
19 
16 
17 
19 
13 

18 
23 



1 
(Cat Bite) 



TOTAL 2010 



198 



2^ 
13 



(1 Cat Bite) 



All dogs not claimed are 

adopted or placed with 
Buddy Dog Humane 



TOTAL 2009 



260 



TOTAL # BARN INSPECTIONS COMPLETED FOR STATE ANIMAL CENSUS 
TOTAL # QUARANTINE ORDERS ISSUED BY ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICE 



39 



Human Bite Quarantine 
Domestic Animal Quarantine 



6 



8 



Refer to Town Clerk 

TOTAL # DOGS LICENSED WITH THE TOWN CLERK'S OFFICE AS OF 12/31/10 Report 

TOTAL # CITATIONS ISSUED BY ANIMAL/DOG CONTROL OFFICE 



82 



LINCOLN COUNCIL ON AGING 

Margaret Boyer, Treasurer 
Florence Caras 
John Caswell 
Crawley Cooper 
Valerie Lee, Recorder 
Don Milan 
Julia Pugh 
Mary Sheldon 
Robert Sutherland 
Barbara Terrano 
Ben Home, Vice-Chair 
Dorothy Taylor, Chair 

Mission Statement: The Council on Aging strives to enrich the lives of Lincoln 
residents 60 years of age or older by providing ongoing activities and 
programs. Assistance is available for problem solving or finding services so 
that it is possible for our senior citizens to enjoy more years of independent 
living in their own homes. In addition, the Council on Aging is a resource to all 
Lincoln residents who request information to help their parents or other elderly 
relatives. It is the responsibility of the Council on Aging to: identify the total 
needs of Lincoln elders; enlist support and participation to meet these needs; 
and design, advocate for and/or implement services to fill these needs. 

A special focus this year has been space needs. We have strived to make 
Bemis Hall as attractive and functional as possible and provide for social space 
through some redecorating and rearranging of rooms. We have also submitted 
a proposal to the Community Preservation Committee for improvements to the 
front entrance. For the future, we have worked with Town officials and seniors 
to create a proposal to the Capital Planning Committee for a feasibility study to 
explore where and what kind of space would be best for a senior or community 
center to meet needs for the coming years. 

2010 saw continued growth of the Council on Aging's programs and services to 
Lincoln's 1674 residents 60 and older and their caregivers. 

• We have significantly expanded our support and discussion group offerings 
and now hold five different groups during the week, including one that 
includes seniors who cannot leave their homes and so participate by 
phone. 

• Our new fitness classes include a section of Tai Chi for beginners, an 
aerobic and weight strengthening class for those who need a gentler, less 
rigorous routine, and tap dancing. 

• We now hold an increased number of one-time informational programs 
each week on such topics as health insurance, legal issues, health and 
wellness, downsizing and home interior design, end-of-life concerns, and 
more. We have made a special effort to serve special populations, 

83 



including holding evening presentations about signing up for benefits for 
younger seniors and programs about in-home services and coping with 
caregiving for caregivers. 

• We have been fortunate to be able to offer a number of concerts and 
dramatic performances, many with donated services, featuring classical, 
jazz, and choral music and a historical presentation. Two of these were 
presented through the Lincoln Cultural Council. 

• Our intergenerational programming is growing with ongoing activities with 
both the Lincoln Nursery School and the Lincoln Family Association. We 
were also thrilled to have three high school students as weekly computer 
tutors during the summer. 

Demand for social services for individual elders who need assistance to remain 
safely in our community continues to increase. Each year we provide more 
information and referral and care management. We also established an 
ongoing group of those who serve elders most in need to ensure that our 
services are coordinated. The group includes the COA, Police and Fire, the 
three churches, the Commission on Disabilities, a liaison from the Selectmen, 
and Minuteman Senior Services. This group joined together to offer a "You Are 
Not Alone" campaign this past fall in which brochures were distributed letting 
elders know that any member of the group is happy to discuss concerns and 
provide information about resources. 

Having an opportunity to make friends and discuss personal issues is essential 
for overall well-being, especially for those who live alone. A number of our 
support groups are specially designed to offer opportunities for elders to 
connect with others, find friends, and talk. In addition, we received a grant from 
the Cambridge Savings Foundation to purchase equipment to video more 
programs and distribute them more widely through the Library and cable tv so 
that those who cannot come to the COA may still enjoy our programs. 

We worked with the Emergency Assistance Committee to ensure that Lincoln 
residents in great need have the resources to cope with financial and other 
crises. Through a grant from the Ogden Codman Trust, we established the 
Small Necessities Project to provide emergency food, medication, lodging, and 
safety-related home repairs to Lincoln residents of all ages. 

To help those at risk of falling stay in our community, we obtained a grant from 
the Ogden Codman Trust for the Home Safe Project to provide free home 
safety evaluations from a physical therapist and the COA's Assistant Director. 

Almost 150 volunteers contribute to the success of our programs. The COA 
Board, Friends of the Council on Aging Board, LINC drivers, Meals on Wheels 
Drivers, hosts and hostesses of programs and clinics, computer tutors, 
teachers of classes, leaders of groups and trips, newsletter collators, and 
more, all contribute. A special thanks goes to the Friends of the Council on 
Aging for funding so many of our programs and activities. 

84 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 

Rob Stuart-Vail 

Adeline Naiman 

Ruth Rothstein 

Anita Scheipers, ex officio 

Deb Dorsey, Chair 

John Ritz, acting co-Chair 

Jim Spindler, acting co-Chair 

A disability may affect a person from birth or at any age. It may result from a 
genetic cause, an accident, illness, or aging (and ours is an aging population). 
It may be physical, sensory, communicative, emotional, or intellectual. It may 
be incapacitating or merely a hindrance. It affects the quality of life for the 
disabled individual, family and household members, friends, and caretakers. It 
is not shameful and should not be denied or concealed out of embarrassment. 
We are all subject to disablement and should try to provide the best resources 
to those who need help. One problem is that until a disability strikes close to 
home, we are unlikely to be aware of the limits it can impose. Another is 
people's self-consciousness and desire for privacy, even at cost to their quality 
of life. 

This year marked the 20 th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act 
(ADA). Much has been accomplished, which inspires us to continue efforts 
toward the significant problems yet to be solved. 

The main purpose of the LCD is to provide assistance to Lincoln residents and 
town officials in dealing with disabling conditions. In the past, we have helped 
survey the town's public buildings and spaces to assure that they provide 
access to all, in accordance with ADA requirements. Improvements to Bemis 
Hall and the Library are sample outcomes. We have provided information to 
townspeople and helped with issues they have raised. 

This year saw the retirement of a greatly esteemed member, Adeline Naiman, 
whose service to the Commission has been invaluable. Time constraints forced 
the resignation of Ruth Rothstein, a new member who managed to accomplish 
much in her tenure. Similar reasons forced Deb Dorsey to temporarily vacate 
the Chair. We have welcomed the continued support of the Council on Aging, 
whose director, Carolyn Bottum, has attended our meetings regularly; her input 
has been most valuable. Interested parties are highly encouraged to become 
involved, as membership is at a critically low level. Especially sought are 
individuals touched by disability, but anyone's help is appreciated. 

In 2010, Mr. Spindler represented the Commission on the Town Offices Study 
Committee. The Commission assisted the Ryan Estate in reviewing options for 
an eventually successful application for a variance from the Architectural 
Access Board for outside rear access. One member completed the 

85 



Massachusetts Office on Disability Community Access Monitor Program. The 
Commission also worked with the Highway Department and other town entities 
this year to improve HP parking at the MBTA lot and to support the proposal of 
a walkway between the Ryan Estate and the Cambridge Trust building. We 
contacted MBTA officials and local representatives in a continuing effort to 
make Lincoln Station fully accessible. The commission also flow-charted the 
permit process for building to allow input at the appropriate stages. 

Our outreach efforts resulted in contacts with the Cambridge, Winchester and 
Arlington Commissions as well as the Disability Policy Consortium. 
Representatives of the DPC, the Mass Office on Disability, the Architectural 
Access Board, and the Lincoln Housing Commission gave presentations to the 
Commission. 

In 201 1, Mr. Spindler will continue his role on the TOSC. Mr. Ritz will be acting 
as liaison to the School Building Committee. 



86 



PUBLIC WORKS 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

2010 was yet another good year for the Lincoln Department of Public Works. 

In May, 2010 The Department welcomed Ian Wilkins as a new Crew Member. 
In September, The Department hired a temporary full time employee. 

In 2010, a major milestone for the Department was finished. Phase 1 of the 
Town's road reconstruction project was completed including: 

• Baker Bridge Road 

• Bedford Road (North) 

• Sandy Pond Road (Between Baker Bridge Road & Lincoln Road) 

• Trapelo Road 

• Concord Road 

Snow fall in January and February 2010 was indicative of a typical 
Massachusetts winter. The month of December brought some challenging 
snow removal activities as two large storms and several smaller one barreled 
through the area. The winter of 2009 - 2010 brought approximately 4 feet of 
snow. The Lincoln DPW crews got an early start on the storms and did an 
excellent job clearing the snow and ice. 

The Department used its two slide-in sanders and new trucks with great 
effectiveness. The municipal tractor continued to do a good job cleaning snow 
from sidewalks and pathways. In 2010, Public Works only used in-house staff 
for snow removal from sidewalks. Using in-house staff, reduces damage to the 
pathways and abutting properties. 

Transitioning from the winter snow and ice control activities to the springtime 
work; the Department performed roadway and path maintenance through the 
months of April and May. This included street sweeping, pothole repair, and 
roadside path repair. Rehabilitation efforts on multiple paths continued 
including Bedford Road, Lincoln Road, and Trapelo Road. During the spring 
the Department also continued the process of removing tons of built up sand 
on the roadway shoulders. This sand was built up over decades and is the 
result of our heavy reliance on sand for snow and ice control. The sand 
interferes with the roadway drainage and is a major contribution to pavement 
damage. 

The Department purchased a Bobcat Toolcat Work Machine with a many 
attachments to assist in snow removal, pathway clearing and year round 
maintenance. These attachments include: a Plow, Snow Blower, Sander, 
Bucket, Broom Attachments and Mower. 



87 



This past summer, the Department fixed the elevation of numerous 
catchbasins, performed roadside vegetative maintenance, performed roadway 
striping, cut dead roadside trees, and filled potholes. We also continued an 
extensive rebuilding of the Town's historic stone walls. Many of these walls 
have fallen into disrepair, and we have begun the process to fix them. Repairs 
to the retaining walls were also done on Trapelo Road. 

The Public Works Department continued to use the municipal tractor to trim 
back overgrown roadside vegetation. By trimming back this vegetation the 
Town's residents have a safer, more aesthetically pleasing roadway. The 
beautiful farmer's stone walls that we have been repairing can now be seen 
and enjoyed. 

During the fall, the Department cleaned leaves and fixed damaged catch 
basins. The Department also continued with its roadside program, trimming 
approximately 20 miles of roadside. We also cleaned the shoulder areas of the 
Causeway, thus being able to widen the road by the reservoir. 

During the course of the year, the Department was also tasked with the 
operation of the Town's Transfer Station, and maintenance and operation of 
the Town's cemeteries. New pavement striping and new fencing were also 
installed at the Transfer Station. 

Looking ahead to 2011, the Department anticipates moving ahead on the 
Phase II Paving Plan, continuation of the trail and path maintenance program, 
continued improvements to the Transfer Station, further developing the 
roadside improvement/gateway program, a new leaf removal program, and 
continued development of the Public Works yard. 

The 2010 Lincoln Department of Public Works: 

Chris Bibbo - Superintendent 

Joe Hayward - Foreman 

David McKnight - Crew Chief 

Carol Withycombe - Administrative Secretary 

Stephen Bicheler (Temporary Employee) 

Danny Desmond 

Bob Maker 

Steve McDonald 

John Neri 

Gary White 

Ian Wilkins 



88 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Susan Harding 
Alexander Pugh 
Manley Boyce 

Susan Brooks, Town Clerk and Agent for the Cemetery Commission 

The focus this year was on addressing and adhering to the historical integrity of 
our cemeteries, The Commission is pleased that our choice of Minzie J. 
Fannin and Jim Fannin of the Fannin - Lehner Preservation Consultants has 
already resulted in valuable and insightful plans for the preservation, 
restoration and conserving of the monuments in the Arbor Vitae Cemetery. 
The careful assessment by these preservation consultants revealed areas of 
both concern and promise that will require monument conservation and 
artisanal crafting to replicate and restore the valuable eighteenth and 
nineteenth century methodology in terms of gravestones and monuments. All 
members of the Commission are optimistic that the result of this very pristine 
and precise work will preserve monuments for the future enjoyment of our 
townspeople. 

The Lexington Road Cemetery is about to expand its borders. This "Expansion 
Area" is close to completion and is awaiting the final surveying of lots and will 
be ready to sell these lots, hopefully by the end of the year 2011. In addition, 
during the past year, there has been a map placed at the entrance of the 
cemetery displaying newly-named roads and lot numbers for ease in finding 
lots. 

The Commission has been compiling a list of duties for the anticipated hiring of 
a part-time employee to maintain the cemeteries. 

As always the integrity of the cemeteries and the monuments are to be 
honored by quiet and respectful visits. 

The Commission thanks our Town Clerk and Agent, Susan Brooks for her 
proficient and diligent work on our behalf. The extra hours expended on our 
behalf is appreciated by all of us. We also wish to recognize Douglas and 
Susan Harding, Joan Kessel, Alaric Naiman and Mary Newman for their 
thoughtful and generous contributions of plants, flowers and bushes to our 
cemeteries. 



89 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Despena F. Billings 

Paul Giese 

Andrew J. Cole, M.D., Chair 

Gregory Woods, Superintendent 



Lincoln's Water Management Act (WMA) permit was issued by the 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection in February, 2010. 
The new permit included stricter water conservation guidelines and a 
compliance time line for achieving those conservation benchmarks. Lincoln's 
current WMA yearly withdrawal limit is 222.65 million gallons, and the 
Department pumped 203.7 million gallons in 2010. This year's water use was 
7.8% above the 187.9 million gallons pumped in 2009, and was mainly 
attributable to the excessively dry months of July and August. Lincoln's new 
permit included a drastic reduction in the yearly water allocation starting in 
2014. For the ten years following 2014, the Town's withdrawal limit will be 
182.5 million gallons. The Town has pumped less than that quantity of water 
only once in the last seven years. 

In addition to the reduction in the overall water withdrawal, the State has also 
required that the Town reduce individual water consumption to the 65 gallons 
per person per day performance standard by December 31, 2011. For the 
2008 and 2009 calendar years, Lincoln's consumption was 76 and 66 gallons 
per person per capita day, respectively. However, this year's excessively high 
water use will push the per person usage back into the upper 70's. Lincoln 
typically meets the 65 gallons per person standard between the months of 
November and March, however water use increases roughly 45% between 
May through September. This increase is due primarily to residential outdoor 
water use via automated irrigation systems. 

As a result of these new State-mandated restrictions, water conservation 
remains a priority for the Department. The Department implemented a WMA 
permit-mandated outdoor water restriction between the months of May and 
September. Department staff monitored residents and handed out reminder 
notices to those that were irrigating on the incorrect days and/or times. No 
fines were assessed this summer in an effort to make sure residents were 
aware of what will likely be a permanent summer water restriction. The Board 
of Water Commissioners is discussing several additional water conservation 
methods to help reduce the Town's water consumption and ensure compliance 
with the regulatory restrictions. 

Water Department staff remained busy this year with system maintenance and 
upgrades. The water mains were flushed in the spring to remove any 
accumulation of iron and manganese that may have occurred over the year. 
Several fire hydrants were replaced, as well as approximately 400 feet of 

90 



ductile iron water main adjacent to Silver Hill Road. Approximately 400 feet of 
new ductile iron main were installed off of Deerhaven Road. The Department 
has continued its meter modernization program, which includes the installation 
of new residential water meters that contain radio communication technology. 
These new meters electronically transmit the meter reading to a handheld 
device, allowing Department staff to more accurately and efficiently read the 
meters. A total of 122 meters were replaced in 2010. 

The filter replacement project at the micro-filtration plant was completed in 
March, 2010. The manufacturer, Siemens Water Technologies Corporation, 
replaced the 240 filter cartridges and oversaw the piping and programming 
changes associated with the filter's chemical cleaning process. The 
Department is working toward revising the method of disposal for the 
neutralized cleaning fluids through its existing EPA-approved discharge permit 
rather than off-site disposal. 

The Department hired a part-time administrative assistant in October to provide 
support with customer service inquires, water meter billing and other office 
duties. The Department staff also includes two water operators and a 
treatment plant operator, in addition to the Superintendent. This staff of 
licensed professionals ensures the proper treatment and delivery of your 
drinking water, every day of the year. 



A table of annual residential water use, listed by address, is provided on 
the Water Department page of the Town's website. 

http://www.lincolntown.org/depts/water.htm 



91 



PLANNING, ZONING, AND CONSERVATION 

PLANNING BOARD 

Dan Boynton 
James Craig 
Robert Domnitz 
Ken Hurd 
Bryce Wolf, Chair 

The 2010 Town Elections confirmed Dan Boynton's election to the Planning 
Board seat to which he had previously been appointed. In addition, Bob 
Domnitz was elected to serve a second term. We are delighted to have such 
knowledgeable and engaging colleagues, and stability in the ranks. 

Capping off last year's work, the Comprehensive Plan, as accepted by Town 
Meeting in November 2009, was filed officially with the State. We were later 
pleased to learn that it received an award as an outstanding comprehensive 
plan from the Mass. Chapter of the American Planning Association. An 
Implementation Committee has now been appointed and begun work in an 
overall monitoring role. 

A second committee, the Lincoln Station Planning Committee, has been 
organized to explore the potential for higher-density development in the Lincoln 
Station area. This group will study transportation, commercial/retail and 
housing needs, and septic options among other issues. Particular attention 
has already been given to the Town's roadway improvement plans, which will 
enhance both pedestrian and vehicular access along this part of Lincoln Road. 

Several Zoning Bylaw amendments were approved at the 2010 Town Meeting, 
most of which dealt with housekeeping changes, such as bringing our Flood 
Plain District in line with revised Flood Insurance Rate Maps, and aligning our 
requirements regarding agricultural uses with state law. More significantly, 
together with the Green Energy Technology Committee, we succeeded in 
establishing a Solar Overlay District at the Minuteman School. This step, 
among others, allowed the Town to qualify as a "Green Community" as 
designated by the State. We continue to work on refining our Zoning Bylaw, 
and anticipate bringing additional amendments to the 2011 Town Meeting. A 
perceived need for additional cell tower location(s) and refinements to our site 
plan approval requirements are likely to receive attention, among other 
concerns. 

Efforts have continued to move the state's Route 2 Crosby's Corner project 
towards implementation. Additional information was submitted in support of 
funding in the Transportation Improvement Program and a strong liaison was 
maintained with relevant personnel to monitor and press for progress on 100% 



92 



design and environmental permitting. The project appears to be on track for a 
construction start in early 2012 but we still await 100% design details. 

The Board remained busy in its permitting activities, despite no large projects 
in the pipeline. We completed site plan reviews for two business properties 
and thirteen residential properties comprising nine new houses (five on 
teardown sites), two house additions and two large barn/accessory buildings. 
There have also been more than a dozen applications for minor changes to 
previously approved site plans. Noted approvals include the restaurant AKA 
Bistro and the Lincoln Wine and Cheese Shop. Some minor changes were 
approved to the plans for The Groves development and we were pleased to 
see it open for occupancy in July. Other matters processed by the Board 
include two special permits for wireless communication facilities involving 
substitution of antenna equipment, one 'Approval Not Required' plan under the 
state subdivision control law, one fence plan approval, three sign permits, and 
three recommendations to the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

Our Town Planner, Mark Whitehead, departed at the end of 2009. The 
Planning Board, together with other land use boards (Conservation Com., 
Housing Com., ZBA, Historic Com.) and others took the opportunity to examine 
function and coordination among the various boards, including the Building 
Dept. After much discussion, it was agreed that a Director of Planning and 
Land Use Permitting would be hired to oversee all operations, and thus we 
welcomed Chris Reilly in September. We thank Catherine Perry, the Planning 
Board Administrative Assistant, for capably taking on much additional work 
during the interim period. The Land Use Chairs group has proven so 
successful we intend to continue as a working group to address additional 
issues of mutual concern. 

Our Planning Applications Database has been extended back in time through 
the volunteer services of Dilla Tingley, a past member of the Planning Board, 
who researched and input data. This data, helpful to several permitting 
authorities, now include all site plans approved under the 'big house bylaw' 
which will help to identify properties where future changes need approval. 

We remain aware and involved with various regional organizations, such as 
HATS (Hanscom Area Towns), MAGIC (Minuteman Advisory Group on 
Interlocal Coordination), and the Battle Road Scenic Byway, as well as the 
MAPC (Metropolitan Area Planning Council). 

Despite the down economy, we continue to see interest in Lincoln 
development, especially in the construction of large homes. We await the 2010 
census results to see if the Town may become vulnerable to the pressure of a 
possible 40B project. And we look at the uncertainties generated by the 
privatized housing redevelopment at Hanscom Field AFB. Traffic concerns, 
cell towers, teardowns and other issues continue to occupy us. The minutes of 
our meetings are available on the Planning Board page of the Town website, 

93 



as are links to other useful documents such as the Zoning Bylaw, the 
Comprehensive Plan, and the Land Use Permitting Guide. We welcome your 

interest. 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

William Constable, Representative 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is a regional planning agency 
serving the people who live and work in the 101 cities and towns of Greater 
Boston. With a mission to promote smart growth and regional collaboration, 
MAPC's work is guided by our regional plan, "MetroFuture: Making a Greater 
Boston Region." 

This year, we have increasingly focused our work on helping municipalities to 
collaborate across city and town borders, to achieve savings through new 
efficiencies, to capitalize on the existing and multifaceted resources of Greater 
Boston, and to explore innovation in unexpected ways. As fiscal challenges 
have intensified at the local level, MAPC has amplified its commitment to 
partnering with cities and towns in offering progressive solutions. We're 
expanding our reach into new areas - from the federal policy arena, to green 
energy development, and interactive gaming as a tool for community 
engagement - while keeping an eye toward preservation, sustainability, and 
responsible stewardship of our shared resources. In every effort we undertake, 
MAPC works toward a more equitable, livable Greater Boston region. 

At the core of our mission is serving as a resource to our member 
municipalities. 



To read the entire report, please check our website: 
http://www.lincolntown.org/adobe acrobat files/town meeting 

Check www.mapc.org for news and updates about MAPC's work throughout 
the year. 



94 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Steve Daigle 

Joel Freedman 

David Henken, Associate Member 

Jefferson Macklin 

Margaret Olson, Associate Member 

Megan Stride 

David Summer, Associate Member 

John R.H. Kimball, Chair 

There were 31 applications filed, 12 meetings held, and 12 applications for renewals in 
2010. The list below represents the cases, other than renewals, considered by the 
Board in 2010. Win Quayle retired from the Board after many dedicated years of 
service. David Henken was appointed an associate member, and Megan Stride became 
a full member. 

January 28, 2010 

• Countryside Building and Dev. Corp. 31 Conant Road, special permit to 
reconstruct a single family home and garage GRANTED 

• Jatinder Gill and Lisa Barna, 19 Juniper Ridge Road, special permit to 
construct additions to existing home GRANTED 

February 25, 2010 

• Thomas Wilmot, 8 Longmeadow Road, special permit to construct additions to 
existing home GRANTED 

• Gerard and Cecelia O'Doherty, 12 Morningside Lane, special permit to 
construct additions to existing home GRANTED 

• Virginia Sherwood and David Forbes, 38 Old Winter Street, special permit to 
replace existing greenhouse with a larger sunroom GRANTED 

April 1,2010 

• Jeannine Taylor, 9 Granville Road, special permit to construct additions to 
existing home GRANTED 

• Kevin O'Rourke and Amanda Hill, 53 Lincoln Road, special permit to construct 
additions to existing home GRANTED 

April 29, 2010 

• Richard and Whitney Hermann, 25 Bypass Road, special permit to construct 
additions to existing home GRANTED 

• Daphne Blount, 11 Old County Road, special permit to construct additions to 
existing home GRANTED 

• Bruce Fairless, 115 Winter Street, special permit for to construct additions to 
existing home GRANTED 

• Wesley Pike Jr., 109 Old Sudbury Road, special permit to construct additions 
to existing home GRANTED 

• David and Patty Levy, 38 Tower Road, special permit to construct additions to 
existing home GRANTED 

• Geoff and Tricia McGean, 51 Old Concord Road, special permit to construct an 
addition to existing home GRANTED 

May 20. 2010 

• Bijoy M. Misra, 180 Bedford Road, special permit for an accessory structure, a 
potting shed GRANTED 

95 



• Stephen Yankum, 142 Sandy Pond Road, special permit for an accessory 
structure, a shed GRANTED 

• Munroe Tree and Landscape Co., 9-11-13 Lewis Street, renewal of special 
permits GRANTED 

June 17, 2010 

• Board of Selectmen, Town of Lincoln, 12 Airport Road, special permit to 
reconstruct a single family dwelling under 4.3 and 4.4 of the zoning bylaw 

GRANTED IN PART 

• Arthur and Cynthia Sweetser, 28 Tabor Hill Road, special permit for additions 
to existing home GRANTED 

August 5, 2010 

• Curtis and Jean Risley, 21 Old Concord Road, special permit for additions to 
an existing home GRANTED 

• Phil Odence, 44 Farrar Road, special permit to replace existing barn 

GRANTED 

• Betsy Hochberg and Dan Bakinowski., 99 Trapelo Road, special permit to 
enlarge existing garage WITHDRAWN 

• Jatinder Gill and Lisa Barna, 19 Juniper Ridge Road, special permit to add 
detached garage WITHDRAWN 

• Munroe Holdings LLC, 11 Lewis Street, special permit to lease 11 Lewis Street 
to Pro Ambulance Service for housing an Advanced Life Support (ALS) vehicle 
and two paramedics GRANTED 

September 30, 2010 

• Irene Chu and Cynthia Dechristofaro, 1 Pine Ridge Road, special permit to 
construct additions to existing home GRANTED 

• Jatinder Gill and Lisa Barna, 19 Juniper Ridge Road, for changes to a 
previously approved plan CONTINUED 

• Lawrence Herthel, 199 Concord Road for renovation and relocation of an 
accessory structure, a carriage house DENIED 

October 21, 2010 

• Richard Gammack and Dawn Palmer, special permit to construct additions to 
an existing home GRANTED 

• Dennis and Jamia Liu, 130 Lexington Road, special permit to reconstruct a 
single family home GRANTED 

• Jun Feng and Ling Li, 166 South Great Road, special permit to construct 
additions to an existing home GRANTED 

November 18, 2010 

• Ray and Kathleen Shepard, 37 Beaver Pond Road, special permit to construct 
an addition to an existing home GRANTED 

December 16, 2010 Stephen Gladstone, 67 Winter St. special permit for an accessory 
apartment GRANTED 



96 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION and 
LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Douglas Adams 

James Craig (Historic District Commission only) 

Andrew Glass (Alternate - HDC & LHC) 

Henry B. Hoover, Jr. (Alternate - LHC) 

Kenneth Hurd (Historic District Commission only) 

Jack MacLean (Alternate - HDC) 

Andrew Ory 

Colin Smith 

Laurence W. Zuelke (Alternate - LHC) 

Lucretia Giese (Chair for LHC) 

Ruth Wales (Chair for HDC) 

The Lincoln Historical Commission is responsible for preservation of all 
structures outside the Historic District and also reviews requests for demolition 
under the Demolition Delay By-law. The Historic District Commission reviews 
applications for all exterior changes within the District visible from a public way. 
The Commissions welcomed new member Douglas Adams who replaced Kerry 
Glass, a valued member for many years. 

Lincoln Historical Commission 

Demolition Approvals: 

41 Brooks Road - house (after demolition plan review) 

16 Old Sudbury Road - house and barn (after demolition plan review) 

17 Boyce Farm Road - house (after demolition plan review) 
157 Bedford Road - house 

44 Farrar Road - barn/garage 

130 Lexington Road - house 

1 99 Concord Road - garage (after demolition plan review) 

55 Oxbow Road - barn, chicken coop and shed 

28 Winter Street - house (after demolition plan review) 

Demolition Denial: 

17 Boyce Farm Road - house (architecturally significant) 

199 Concord Road - garage attached to historic carriage house 

28 Winter Street - house (architecturally significant) 

Historic District Commission 

Certificates of Appropriateness: 

14 Bedford Road - sign for Lincoln Nursery School 
16 Lincoln Road - generator for Town Offices 

7 Lincoln Road - new entry landings, new stone wall, and new deck 
16 Weston Road - changes to windows and door 

15 Bedford Road - copper gutter downspouts at Bemis Hall 

97 



Certificates of Non-Applicability: 

36 Codman Road - repairs to retaining walls and rear stairs 

36 Codman Road - repairs to wood shed at Codman Estate 

1 9 Bedford Road - roof repairs 

22 Weston Road - window replacement 

15 Bedford Road - repairs to cupola and railings at Bemis Hall 

1 5 Sandy Pond Road - roof repairs to barn 

64 Conant Road - window replacement 

The Lincoln Historical Commission is pleased to report completion of further 
inventory work on buildings and structures in Lincoln: sixteen buildings and 
structures in the Peirce Hill Area with a study of the Area itself; one building 
and structure on Old Sudbury Road; and thirty-two buildings dating from 1900 
to 1930 in various locations. The LHC continues to consider inventorying Town 
buildings and structures a priority for educational and informational reasons. 
The Long Range Planning Committee confirmed this priority in its report to the 
Town in 2010. 

The Commission also prepared a statement for the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission and the Cultural Resources Manager, Department of the Air 
Force, c/o Hanscom Air Force Base, Lincoln, about a large housing 
development on the Base. The LHC expressed its concern about the project's 
potential adverse effects on the historical fabric of the Park, a National 
Landmark, and visitor experience. The LHC's statement was accompanied by 
a pamphlet entitled "Hanscom Housing & Minute Man National Historical Park" 
(2010), prepared by John C. MacLean. 



98 



LINCOLN HOUSING COMMISSION 

Renel Fredriksen 
George Georges 
Connie Lewis 
Mary Sheldon 
Robert Wadsworth 
Pamela Gallup, Chair 

In 2007, Lincoln reached its goal of having 10% of its housing stock affordable. 
This target keeps us safe from hostile 40B developments until the new federal 
census numbers are released in late spring of 2011. At this writing, we 
anticipate that we will be short between 4 and 6 units to maintain that 10% 
goal. We have a few irons in the fire and are optimistic that we will close this 
gap in time to keep the Town out of danger. While meeting State guidelines is 
far from our sole purpose, the severe potential cost to the Town if we do not 
maintain these numbers did drive much of our work in 2009 and 2010. 

In March of 2010 we contracted with WATCH of Waltham to handle the 
maintenance and tenant administration of our town owned units. Outsourcing 
this work has allowed the Commission to work on policy and procedures for 
managing our program and complying with both state and federal guidelines. 
We now have in place a Tenant Selection Plan and we are currently working 
on a Policy and Procedure Manual. 

The Commission is investigating subscribing to a Regional Housing Program 
sponsored by the Town of Sudbury. We hope to join with Bedford, Concord, 
Lexington and Weston to form a regional program that will meet our needs and 
give us an opportunity to collaborate on our common problems. 

With the help of CPC funds we will hire a consultant to work on a Long Range 
Housing Plan to replace the plan of 2003. We look forward to working with a 
consultant to help guide the future of affordable housing in Lincoln. 

This year saw Phyllis Mutschler retired from the Commission after serving for 
over 2 years. During this period, Phyllis helped us to write a Tenant Selection 
Plan and Policy and Procedures Manual. While we will miss Phyllis, we were 
very pleased to gain Robert Wadsworth on the Commission. Robert is 
presently a consultant with the Boston Foundation and has many years of 
public service in the affordable housing arena. 

As always, we remain indebted to Earl Midgley, Building Inspector, for his 
many years of service to the Housing Commission. Earl retired this past 
summer and we miss his attention to detail, prompt service response and 
sensitive attention to our tenants needs. We appreciate the assistance of 
Elaine Carroll in fielding phone calls and managing our outsource to WATCH 

99 



for property maintenance and tenant administration; Debra Parkhurst for a 
variety of support tasks, Tim Higgins for his expertise in helping us promote 
affordable housing in Lincoln, and Anita Scheipers for her valuable 
contributions on many issues and keeping us on track. Our new Land Use 
Coordinator, Chris Reilly has been a valuable resource on many housing and 
planning issues and we look forward to working with him for many years to 
come. 

We are very appreciative of the support of the Lincoln Foundation, Affordable 
Housing Trust, Community Preservation Committee, Disabilities Commission, 
Historic Commission, and residents of Lincoln, who continue to support 
affordable housing in our town. Lincoln is very fortunate to have such dedicated 
residents and employees supporting our efforts to maintain the diversity and 
rural, small town character of Lincoln. 



100 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Jim Henderson 

Joyce Hersh 

Ben Home 

Ari Kurtz 

Sara Lewis 

Jim Meadors, co-Chair 

Peter von Mertens, co-Chair 

Lincoln's volunteer Conservation Commission and the Conservation 
Department work hard to preserve the ecological integrity of our land and water 
resources. If you are interested in learning more about the Commission please 
feel free to attend our public meetings, typically held on the first and third 
Wednesdays each month, or stop by the Town Offices and meet the staff. 
Please contact our office to arrange a site visit to your property, or a meeting in 
the office, to discuss any wetlands or other natural resource issues you may 
have. 

Jim Henderson, Jim Meadors, and Peter von Mertens were reappointed to 
three-year terms and our staff remained the same. We have two fulltime staff; 
Tom Gumbart, Conservation Director and Anna Wilkins, Land Manager. Angela 
Kearney, our Conservation Planner works 30 hours/week, and Jane Layton, 
our Conservation Ranger works 20 hours/week. When funds are available we 
also hire seasonal staff to assist with field work. 

The Conservation Commission administers the MA Wetlands Protection Act 
and our local Wetlands Protection Bylaw to ensure proposed projects do not 
adversely affect wetland and buffer zone resources. During permitting we 
conduct site visits, assist residents with the process, review permit 
applications, and conduct hearings with applicants. Typically the Commission 
requires specific conditions for construction within 100 feet of wetlands or 
within 200 feet of any perennial stream. In 2010 there were 10 Notices of 
Intent, 5 Requests for Determination of Applicability, 2 Notices of Resource 
Area Delineations, and 1 Emergency Certification. Prior to undertaking any 
land clearing activity or new construction please check with the Commission to 
see if your proposed work is located within a protected resource area. 

We encourage everyone to use the Town's web-based Geographic Information 
System (GIS). In 2010 it was completely revised and improved with a new host. 
From your home computer you can access a variety of data layers for the 
Town, ranging from lot lines to aerial photos to wetlands. Go to the website 
www.caigisonline.com/LincolnMA/Default.aspx to access this great program. 

The Commission is responsible for stewardship on municipal conservation land 
and for oversight of private conservation restrictions held by the Town to make 
sure these lands are preserved for future generations. Annual monitoring is 
done on all of these conservation properties and this is made possible by 

101 



interns who work out of our office but are generously funded by the Lincoln 
Land Conservation Trust (LLCT). We work closely with the LLCT, the Rural 
Land Foundation, and the many other organizations and agencies that own or 
manage open space within our borders. 

Highlighting land protection in 2010 was the successful completion of the South 
Lincoln Farms project that permanently preserves 11 acres of agricultural land 
in the scenic Old Sudbury Road corridor. This includes 33 acres of the historic 
Van Leer Farm and 44 acres of the historic Boyce Farm. Of this land, 21 acres 
are south of Old Sudbury Road and this is now Town conservation land. 
Massachusetts Agricultural Preservation Restrictions protect these 21 acres 
and an additional 56 acres owned by Drumlin Farm of MA Audubon that lie 
directly to the north. This was a very collaborative process done with the help 
of many residents, Town Boards, the Rural Land Foundation, the LLCT, the 
MA Audubon Society, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The major field project of year was the construction of the boardwalk that now 
connects the Van Leer Farm to Weston Conservation Land. Thanks to the 
many volunteers who assisted with this huge project. The boardwalk follows an 
easement granted by Roy MacDowell through a beautiful red maple swamp. 
The Weston Forest and Trail Association generously provided funding and off- 
site construction assistance for this boardwalk. Another important land 
management project was the 2nd annual Garlic Mustard Pull Day which was 
very successful in terms of community participation and the volume of biomass 
removed from our roadsides and open space. This event was cosponsored 
with the Lincoln Garden Club and the LLCT. These projects were done in 
addition to our regular annual land management activities that range from field 
mowing to trail maintenance. 

Agriculture is a valued aspect of our Lincoln community and the Commission 
licenses nearly 200 acres of Town-owned farmland to a dedicated and diverse 
group of farmers. Licenses are good for a five-year period and 2010 was the 
third year of this period. The farms currently cultivating conservation land are: 
Blue Heron Organic Farm, Busa Farm, Codman Community Farms, Matlock 
(Flint's) Farm, The Food Project, Lindentree Farm, Red Rail Farm, Turtle Creek 
Winery, and Verrill Farm. In 201 1 we will be licensing the Van Leer farmland to 
keep that in agricultural production. 

Our organized educational offerings continue to include a variety of public 
natural history outings and talks cosponsored with LLCT. Again we conducted 
nature walks with the Lincoln Nursery School and Kindergarten classes. Our 
weekly series of Wednesday morning hikes continued in the spring and fall. 
The Conservation Coffee series continues to be successful. These are informal 
gatherings of individuals interested in conservation and land-related issues in 
Lincoln. If you want to be on the e-mail list to be notified about these and other 
events or have other questions or concerns, please contact Tom Gumbart at 
the Conservation office (781-259-2612 or gumbartt@lincolntown.org). 

102 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST (LLCT) 

Susan Allen Paul Shorb 

Gary Anderson Nancy Soulette 

Kenneth E. Bassett Paul Svetz 

James C. Fleming Susan Welsh 

Warren Flint, Jr. William G. Constable, President 

James Henderson Daniel England, Chair 

Susan M. Klem Dwight L. Gertz, Secretary 

John C. B. LeGates Weston Howland III, Treasurer 

David Levy Ellen B. Meadors Asst.Treasurer 

Gwyneth Loud 

The Lincoln Land Conservation Trust (LLCT), founded in 1957, is one of the 
oldest, private, volunteer, land trusts in the country. The LLCT also has the 
distinction of holding the oldest private conservation restriction (known outside of 
Massachusetts as a conservation easement) in the country, dating back to 1962. 
The LLCT is dedicated, per its mission statement, to "maintaining the rural 
character of the Town for the benefit of the inhabitants of Lincoln." Now well into 
its sixth decade of conservation work, LLCT continues to fulfill its mission thanks 
to the selfless efforts of its trustees, members, donors, friends, and other 
supporting organizations in Lincoln and beyond. 

Acquisition: 2010 saw the completion of the Van Leer land acquisition which 
was first initiated back in 1994. Thanks to the tremendous efforts and support of 
town residents working with the Rural Land Foundation and the MA Audubon 
Society, over 77 acres of prime farmland along Old Sudbury Road was 
permanently protected. In addition, with support of the Weston Forest and Trails 
Committee, a 700 ft. boardwalk was constructed by the Conservation 
Commission and neighbors linking the Audubon and Van Leer lands with the trail 
system in Weston Woods. The LLCT added 2 new conservation restrictions 
(CRs) and a trail easement to its holdings this year. The Trust now owns or has 
stewardship responsibilities for, more than 1,000 acres of land that not only 
enhances Lincoln's bucolic landscape, but also helps provide important wildlife 
habitat, scenic vistas, clean drinking water, and a myriad of recreational 
opportunities for our fellow citizens. Together with the Town's Conservation 
Commission), the LLCT maintains nearly 80 miles of inter-connected trails 
throughout Town. 

Stewardship: The year continued a tradition of stewardship collaboration with 
the Lincoln Conservation Commission. With the support of Conservation 
Commission staff, two LLCT staff interns conducted on-site visits and completed 
detailed "monitoring" reports on every parcel of conservation land within the 
jurisdiction of the Town and the LLCT. This amounts to over 2,200 acres of land 
as well as many miles of property boundary lines. These monitoring reports are 
reviewed against the baseline information for a parcel to assess any changes to 
the land and/or compliance with the terms of a CR or conservation deed. These 

103 



"Baseline Studies" and supplemental "Monitoring Reports" are available for 
review at the Lincoln Conservation offices. 

Throughout 2010, the LLCT remained a vigilant protector of the land for which we 
are responsible. Occasionally this has called for simply advising or reminding 
landowners of their responsibilities with respect to protected land they own or 
abut. In other, more severe instances, the LLCT has resorted to appropriate 
formal action to enforce the terms of a CR or to protect land owned by the Trust. 

Land Management: Stewardship also involves managing trails, stonewalls, 
fields, field edges, and invasive species. Thanks to the work of two summer land 
management interns and the tireless efforts of long-time President Buzz 
Constable, the Land Trust properties have never been in better shape The Trust 
also relies heavily on the volunteer efforts of many neighborhoods. Noteworthy 
neighborhood projects over the past year included fence mending and field 
clearing with the Page Road Associates; and invasive removal and field edge 
clearing with the Farrar Pond Condo Association. In addition the LLCT supported 
the Conservation Commission's highly successful town-wide "Garlic Mustard 
Pull". 

Education: The LLCT's education efforts continued to focus on getting kids and 
adults out on the land in 2010. Local experts helped lead bird walks and plant 
identifications walks. In addition, the Land Trust co-sponsored, with the Friends 
of the Library, a fascinating "show and tell" discussion by Rick Roth on "Snakes 
of New England". Gwyn Loud continues to collect wildlife sightings from local 
residents and her informative monthly wildlife column (started by Sue Klem more 
than 10 years ago) is a must read in the Lincoln Journal. LLCT has once again 
given a grant of $3,000 for the second year to the Lincoln Public Schools to 
support ecology education through the science curriculum. In 2010-2011 the 
grant is being used to hire Drumlin Farm naturalists to take students in selected 
grades on nature walks linked to their ecology units. Grade five students had 
outdoor exploration supporting their unit on "Classification and Adaptation 
of Living things." In the spring, Grade One students will have outdoor 
explorations to give hands-on connections to their unit on "Habitats", and Grade 
Four may also participate in the program. For the second year LLCT printed 
Passports to Lincoln's Conservation Land as a way for children and families to 
enjoy a focused exploration of several conservation parcels in Lincoln. The 
passports (free) were passed out by Library staff to all students in kindergarten in 
June. Additional passports were picked up by families from the children's room at 
the Library. The passports are jointly funded by the Friends of the Library. 

Trustees/Staff: The LLCT continues to work closely with its private conservation 
"sister" group, the Rural Land Foundation (RLF). Given the increasing complexity 
of land transactions, the RLF's expertise in acquisition and "conservation 
subdivision" to protect land has been invaluable to the town and a great resource 
for the LLCT. The two organization now share staff and have similar trustees 



104 



which not only facilitates the LLCT's primary role as steward, educator, and 
advocate for protected lands but helps maintain each organization's focus on the 
Town's Open Space Plan for protecting "lands of conservation interest." 

The LLCT, like many other volunteer land trusts, must continually find insightful 
ways to address the increasingly complex nature of land protection and long-term 
management. From "conservation subdivision" pioneered by the RLF as a 
method of saving land, to the holding of restrictions on house size and 
architecture, conservation efforts in Lincoln must continue to creatively and 
diligently balance many competing interests. As we work to protect the important 
conservation land and historic landscapes in Lincoln, the LLCT trustees are 
grateful for the support of our members and for their financial contributions that 
make this work possible. 

LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 
Preliminary selected financial information 
as of December 31, 2010 

2010 Receipts 

Direct Public Support (Contributions) 23,805 

Grants 

Sale of Maps and Books 1,016 

Investment Income 2,351 

Miscellaneous 

Total Receipts 27,172 

2010 Expenses 

Land Management 10,799 

Stewardship 15,644 

Education 3,916 

Acquisition 

Insurance 2,770 

Organization Dues 290 

Miscellaneous 284 

Total Expenses 33,703 

Balance 

Lincoln Conservation Fund 150,617 
Investment Funds 335,287 
Jean W. Preston Memorial 27,768 
Cambridge Trust Company 5,351 

Total Balance 519,023 



105 



LINCOLN AGRICULTURE COMMISSION 

Nancy Bergen 
Lynne Bower 
Jen James 
Kip Kumler 
Ari Kurtz 
Tim Laird, 
Margaret Marsh 
Ellen Raja 
Beth Taylor 

Kit Carmody, Co-Chair, 
Christy Foote-Smith, Co-chair 

The Lincoln Agriculture Commission (LAC) was created by Town Meeting vote in 
2006 to, "preserve, protect and promote agriculture in Lincoln: to provide 
leadership, technical guidance, vision, planning and coordination to help support, 
define, promote and enable new agricultural opportunities, stability and 
enhancement of ongoing operations as well as foster strong community and 
regional support that will work to create a sustainable agricultural community in 
Lincoln... The Commission will also seek further protections for existing 
agricultural lands, the identification of new lands for agricultural use, both public 
and private, and work to assist in natural resource management that is consistent 
with sustainable agricultural practices. " 

With this charge in mind, the LAC has focused its efforts over the past year on 1) 
providing information to the residents of Lincoln about the town's agricultural 
heritage and ongoing farming activities and 2) the development and adoption of a 
"Right to Farm" general bylaw. 

1) Community Outreach: The LAC has reached out to the community on 
several fronts. A video about Lincoln farms and farmers, produced locally a 
number of years ago, was shown multiple times on the local cable access 
channel. Since last August, monthly articles have appeared in the Lincoln Journal 
regarding the Lincoln Agriculture Commission, the history of farming in Lincoln, 
and agriculture and open space. And, on January 12, 2011, the LAC held a 
community forum to discuss the future of agriculture in Lincoln. 

2) Right to Farm Bylaw: The Lincoln Agriculture Commission is 
proposing a non-zoning bylaw to be voted at Town Meeting, March 2011. The 
bylaw provides information to all citizens regarding existing state law pertaining 
to agriculture. Its purposes are to: 

Demonstrate that Lincoln is a farm-friendly community. 

Alert residents that they may expect farming activities in Lincoln. 



106 



Support agricultural activities "associated with generally accepted 

agricultural practices," the same standard the state uses. 

Help maintain Lincoln's rural way of life, not just our rural appearance. 

Embrace Lincoln's agricultural heritage. 

Maintain a community ethic that acknowledges farms as part of our open 

space amenities. 

Implement a key goal of Lincoln's Long Range Plan. 

The proposed bylaw would not permit anything that is not already allowed by 
state law, supersede state, federal or local law, or encourage negligent or poor 
agricultural practices. As of May 2010, over 100 cities and towns in the 
Commonwealth had adopted Right to Farm bylaws. Neighboring Towns that 
have adopted these farm-friendly bylaws include Bolton, Boxford, Danvers, 
Framingham, Harvard, Groton, Littleton, Pepperell, Stow, Sudbury, Westford, 
and Weston. 

In developing the bylaw, the LAC conferred with the Selectmen, Planning Board, 
and Conservation Commission. The members of these boards gave valuable 
input. We also conferred with Town Counsel who was immensely helpful. 

The LAC looks forward to increasing its presence and effectiveness over the 
coming year and welcomes input on how we can best serve the agricultural 
interests of the community. 



107 



GREEN ENERGY AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE 

Laura Berland 
Barbara Buchan 
Elizabeth Cherniack 
Linda Conrad 
Marcus Gleysteen 
Ed Lang 
Jennifer Morris 
Al Schmertzler 
Lynne Smith 
Peter Watkinson 
John Snell, Chair 



At Town Meeting March 2010, the Town voted unanimously to approve two 
warrant articles - adoption of the Stretch Code and secondly, the adoption of 
criteria necessary for Lincoln to qualify as a Massachusetts Green Community. 
The Stretch Code raises standards for energy efficiency in building construction 
codes forming a bridge between the current standards and those likely to be 
adopted in 2012. After submitting our application, in May 2010 Lincoln became 
one of a small but increasing number of towns in the State to receive a grant to 
implement measures to reduce energy consumption and 
explore alternative energy production. 

As a result Lincoln received $140,294 from the Massachusetts Department of 
Energy Resources (DOER). This, in addition to $88,155 from other funding 
sources, including $15,000 from the Codman Trust, will be spent on energy 
upgrades and installations in Town and School facilities plus incentives and 
support for 104 households in town. NStar also gave $2,500 with an incentive for 
which the town could qualify for up to $10,000. This money has been allotted, so 
far, to the Public Schools, Lincoln Public Library, the Public Safety Building and 
the Residential Initiative. The grant money will go towards upgrades of the 
heating system, ventilation units and thermostats at the Schools, improvements 
to lighting, air sealing and attic insulation at the Library, 
and lighting at the Fire and Police Station. 

On October 24, 2010, at the third in a series of town-wide Residential Forums, 
104 households signed up to participate in a program based on the 
Massachusetts Climate Action Network (MCAN) Cool Mass Initiative with the 
goal of reducing collective household energy consumption 20% by 2012. The 
Committee purchased Black and Decker power monitors to monitor whole house 
energy consumption and Kill-a-Watt appliance monitors and gave them to the 
104 households who signed up. Next Step Living, authorized home energy 
auditors from Mass Save, will perform comprehensive energy audits and suggest 
follow-up energy upgrades which could be eligible for up to $1,500 in rebates. A 

108 



follow-up Green Forum in March 2011 will present results of this initiative, recruit 
new households and continue the program into 2011. More information on the 
residential energy initiative is available at www.getreallincoln.org . 



Volunteers enlisted by the Recycling Committee (a sub-Committee of the Green 
Energy and Technology Committee) are helping to sort items taken to the Swap 
Table at the Transfer Station. The Shed, commissioned by Chris Bibbo Head of 
the Department of Public Works (DPW) and built by students from the 
Minuteman High School, is now housing "the better stuff" from the Swap Table, 
stuff that is saved from being swept into the trash dumpster at the end of 
Transfer Station hours on Wednesdays and Saturdays. We hope to support the 
DPW in its goal of focusing on educating the town of the need to 
improve recycling habits. 

We continue to provide news of the Committee's progress with updates, links and 
resources on the web page: http://www.lincolntown.org/GreenEnergyComm.htm . 

Residents can sign up here for the email Greening Lincoln Newsletter. 



109 



LIBRARY, RECREATION, AND SCHOOLS 

TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 2010 

Term Expires 

Diana Abrashkin, Self-Perpetuating 

Jacquelin Apsler, Chair, Selectmen's Appointee 201 1 

Marshall Clemens, School Committee Appointee 2012 

Alfred Kraft, Self-Perpetuating 

Peter Sugar, Self-Perpetuating 

Susan Taylor, Elected 2013 

OUR PHILOSOPHY 

• To act as the Town's central resource for information, scholarship, 
research, literature and literacy, local history and artistic expression. 

• To be the one place where Lincoln's residents of all ages and abilities, 
varied interests, and differing viewpoints find welcome and professional 
assistance in pursuit of personal enrichment, cultural stimulation, 
intellectual connectivity and discourse, professional and volunteer work. 

• To strengthen ties among members of our community and with the world 
beyond. 

INTRODUCTION 

Our mission embodies these endeavors - based on our demographic make-up. 
We do our utmost to be responsive to our citizenry and be efficient in the way we 
handle their many demands. We monitor current trends in library technology and 
are proactive in introducing new and innovative methods to serve our patrons. 

The Lincoln Public Library is committed to providing the community with: 

• A local collection of materials in printed, recorded and electronic formats 

• Free access to a broad range of materials via the Minuteman Library 
Network (MLN), inter- library loans, internet connections, and new formats of 
information and entertainment technology as they become reliable and 
affordable 

• An inviting place for people to visit preserving the building's historical and 
architectural heritage and mindful of its position in the Town's center 

• Professional, knowledgeable, and courteous staff 

• Cultural programs and life-long learning experiences 

• Publicity and community outreach to acquaint residents with library offerings 
and to maintain strong ties with patrons, local schools, Town agencies, 
cultural institutions and community groups 



110 



Local History 

In addition, the Town's historic records have been placed into a newly 
constructed Archive to ensure a properly humidified and protected environment 
for these important materials for current and future generations. This effort was 
carried out in conjunction with the Town; the Town Clerk and the Library Director 
serve as Co-Directors of the new facility. The Library maintains the Town's War 
Memorial Book and War Memorial sculpture on its grounds. 

FY 2010 HIGHLIGHTS 

Statistics 

Total circulation increased 3.2%, patron visits increased 24%, reference 
questions increased 24%, and web visitors decreased 7% in FY 2010. 

Staffing Changes 

Reference Librarian, Jeanne Bracken retired after nineteen years of excellent 
service to the Town. Laura Paryl began as the new Reference Librarian in 
September. Milissa Fellers was the temporary Assistant Children's Librarian 
while Deb Leopold was out on maternity leave. 

Budget and Finances 

At Town Meeting in March Lincoln residents approved a 1.7 percent increase to 
the Library's operating budget to $849,457. This budget allowed the library to 
maintain level services only because of Jeanne Bracken's retirement. The Library 
Trustees' warrant article for regularly scheduled maintenance activities and 
repairs ($19,000) passed at Town Meeting. The Library's request for a $4,500 
grant from the Community Preservation Committee to preserve the first book of 
Lincoln's Vital Records was approved at Town Meeting. 

Accomplishments 

• We held two 'community issues' forums: "Green Home Retrofitting" and 
"Risk-Wise Investor" that addressed our patrons' interest in green technology 
and the recent large stock market decline 

• The Green Technology Committee received a Green Communities grant 
from the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources in the amount of 
$58,982. This money will be used to perform energy upgrades at the Library 

• We started "Open Mike", a monthly live folk music and spoken word program 
for local performers. 

• We provided 'Caregivers' program, co-sponsored with COA, who met twice 
monthly on topics of near and far caregiving issues. 

• Teens now have a special place in the Library: we transformed the formal 
entrance foyer of the 1884 building into a reading lounge for older kids. 
Circulation of teen materials has increased dramatically. 



111 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Jonathan Dwyer 
Chris Fasciano 
Ted Julian 
Ingrid Neri 
Jane Tatlock 
Susan Collins, Chair 

The Lincoln Recreation Committee strives to provide affordable and diverse 
leisure opportunities, community-based special events and safe recreational 
facilities to enhance the quality of life for Lincoln residents of all ages. They set 
policy and oversee all facets of the department including: community programs, 
athletic fields, tennis courts, playgrounds, the Codman Pool, Lincoln Summer 
Day Camp, and various town wide events; as well as strategic facility planning 
and development. 

We deliver these services at a low-cost to the Town, as user fees typically 
recover 80-90% of our annual operating budget. We offer all our programs via 
web registration and accept credit card payments. As the Town navigates 
challenging fiscal waters, we strive to contribute (and not deplete) town 
resources and add to the fabric of daily life. 

The Recreation Office is located in the Hartwell A Pod on Ballfield Road. We 
would like to thank the Lincoln Public Schools for their continued support by 
providing office and programming space. The office is generally open 8:30am - 
4:30pm, but we recommend calling (781-259-0784) before you come by as our 
staff may be out supporting programs at any given time. 

During the school year we offer a wide variety of children's programs, special 
events, trips, sports and adult education classes. All Lincoln residents are 
encouraged to participate. A full list of program and facility information, as well 
as online registration is available at www.LincolnRec.com. 

The Department maintains the town's athletic fields and baseball diamonds with 
annual cycles of slice seeding, aerating, and lime/natural fertilizer applications. 
This will develop healthy, safe turf for the benefit of the public schools, sports 
leagues and community programs. We would like to thank our youth sports 
organizations, Lincoln Youth Soccer and Lincoln /Sudbury Little League, for their 
annual contributions to help offset our costs. 

In fiscal year 2010, the department generated approximately $366,000 in 
revenue and recovered 100% of its budget. In addition to our well-attended 
community programs, we sold over 85 family tennis stickers and over 65 
individual tennis stickers. The Codman Pool had over 300 memberships, its' 
swim team had 127 swimmers, and 136 swim lessons were conducted. The 
summer day camp filled over 810 camper slots and our specialty camps filled an 

112 



additional 85 slots. Our youth basketball program has approximately 118 players 
and our adult fitness program has over 90 participants. We'd like to acknowledge 
the hard work of our staff that makes these programs so successful. 

Our Events Subcommittee oversees annual town-wide events including Patriots 
Day, Memorial Day, July 4 th and our Summer Concert Series. Congratulations to 
all our volunteers for a job very well done! We especially want to thank to our 
sponsoring businesses. We are grateful for their cooperation. 

Our Second Annual Gobble Wobble (pictured), a charity run on Thanksgiving 
morning, attracted 140 participants, who each donated a bag of groceries to 
Open Table in Concord. And our middle school students, while attending their 
December dance, donated over 70 gifts for our local Toys for Tots program. 

We want to recognize the contributions of our outgoing member, Noah 
Eckhouse, who completed his eighth year with the Recreation Committee before 
joining the Board of Selectmen. He remains with us in spirit and has a 
permanent seat at all future Recreation Committee parties! We found an able 
replacement in Jonathan Dwyer, who spent three years overseeing our events 
subcommittee, before joining us formally. He has already made great 
contributions to our work. 

Recreation facilities and offerings are a wonderful component of the Lincoln 
community and we thank you for your support. We are always looking for new 
ways to meet the changing needs and interests of community and welcome any 
suggestions and ideas. 




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PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Jean Home 

Lucia MacMahon 

Max Mason 

Judith Gross, Chairman 

There were 41 events at the Pierce House this year. This includes 10 which were 
for Lincoln residents. There were 50 town functions, 2 retirement parties and 3 
memorial receptions. 

Our fund which sank to a low of $1500 in June of 2009 (largely due to the stock 
market losses) has revived and 
now is at an all time high of $80K. 

With help from the CPC funds we have rebuilt the porch from the terrace to the 
kitchen. With Pierce House funds we expect to complete the renovation of the 
kitchen in 
early 2011. 

The Pierce House gardens have been planned, planted and cared for by a 
company known as Henderson Striker but known to most of us as Nancy and Jim 
Henderson. They are creating new annual flower gardens along the driveway 
which we hope will discourage people from driving on the lawn. We are expecting 
a glorious bust of bloom of color in the Spring! 

We want to thank Ken Basset and the highway crew for removing dead trees and 
the Conservation Commission and Tom and Angela for the new plantings around 
the pond. 

We are grateful to Dana Mahnken who for yet another year has single handedly 
kept the house from falling down. 

Most of all we thank Susan and Richard Silver for their loving care of the house 
and the people using it. As usual as I write this, we have just celebrated the New 
Year 201 1 at another great First Day Celebration. That festive occasion and all 
the others throughout the year would not happen without the Silvers! 



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LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Amy Goodwin 

Barbara Low, Treasurer 

Joanie Schaffner 

Susan Welsh 

Mellnda Abraham, Co-Chair 

Lisa. Putukian, Co-Chair 

The Lincoln Cultural Council (LCC) is a local agency and is a part of the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. Although LCC members are 
appointed by the Selectmen, the LCC does not derive any of its funding from the 
town of Lincoln. All members of the LCC are volunteers. The state legislature 
funds the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) which then distributes funds to 
the local agencies. This is the most extensive public cultural funding network in 
the nation and involves well over 2,000 volunteers state-wide. This system is 
supported in the context that the arts, sciences and humanities build healthier, 
more livable and vital communities. 

During calendar year 2010, the Lincoln Selectmen appointed Lisa Putukian as a 
new member. Resignations were received from Sarah Bishop and Jay Hersh. 
We sincerely thank Ms. Bishop for her two years of volunteer service and Mr. 
Hersh for his three years of volunteer service which included serving as chair of 
the council. Melinda Abraham and Lisa Putukian volunteered to serve as co- 
chairs and Barbara Low agreed to continue to serve as treasurer. 

The LCC provides grants to programs focused on interpretive sciences as well as 
programs in the arts and humanities and tries to fund an assortment of events 
which appeal to a variety of age groups. All funded programs must fall within the 
requirements established by the MCC. 

Given Lincoln's small population we receive the minimum allocation each year. 
For calendar year 2010 the Council received $4,000 from the MCC, plus the LCC 
was the recipient of a Gold Star quality award for the "Buccaneers of Buzz" 
presentation which was funded by the council in 2009. The award included a 
$200 prize. 

For calendar year 2010 the LCC received 18 grant applications and funded the 
following 1 1 projects: 

• Jewels from the Lincoln Town Archives (Grantee: Lincoln Public Library) 

• Guitar Songs from the Old Countries (Grantee: Lincoln Council on 
Aging) 

• And Now Mark Twain (Grantee: Richard Clark) 

• American Women of Note (Grantee: Concord Women's Chorus) 

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• History Alive Presentation (Grantee: Lincoln Sudbury Regional High 
School) 

• Scapes Sounds Installation at DeCordova (Grantee: Halsey Burgund) 

• SMART (Sci-Math-Art) Gals Family Night (Grantee: Discovery 
Museums) 

• Lincoln Sudbury Dance Troupe Choreography Commission (Grantee: 
Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School) 

• Musical History Tour with the Flute (Grantee: Wendy Rolfe) 

• Artists of Lincoln (Lincoln Public Library event, reception sponsored by 
Lincoln Cultural Council) 

• Travis Roy Motivational Presentations (Grantee: Travis Roy) 

The LCC initiated and partially funded the Travis Roy presentations which 
occurred in September 2009 and were funded in CY2010 (FY10 funds). The 
event leveraged additional funding from several organizations including the 
following Lincoln groups: the PTA, the Lincoln School Foundation, and the 
Friends of the Library. In-kind services were provided by the Disabilities 
Commission and the Lincoln School Administration. The school administration 
provided buses to allow the students at the Middle School at Hanscom Air Force 
Base to join the Brooks School students for the event. The school administration 
also hired a sign language interpreter for the event. The Disabilities Commission 
located the sign language interpreter and provided personnel to introduce the 
speaker. One session occurred during school hours at Brooks School and a 
second session was held in the evening for the general public. In total, over 600 
people attended the Travis Roy lectures. 

Travis Roy's presentations highlighted the fundamental importance of 
communities in helping individuals to deal with the challenges of life. Given the 
tremendous response and positive feedback about this event, the LCC submitted 
an application to the MCC to consider this event for a quality award. 

In November, the LCC reviewed 14 grant applications for events to occur in 
201 1 . The LCC received $3870 from the MCC for fiscal year 201 1 and intends to 
distribute the funds among seven successful applicants. 

The LCC encourages town residents to make suggestions for programs they 
would like to see in the future and that comply with all applicable MCC 
guidelines. The LCC welcomes opportunities to collaborate with other town 
organizations. 

In summary, thousands of Lincoln residents (and in some cases residents from 
neighboring towns) have participated in and benefited from the diverse 
multicultural events sponsored in whole or in part by the LCC and the MCC. 



116 



LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Tim Christenfeld 

Joe Connell, Hanscom Representative 

Jen James 

Debbie John, METCO Representative 

Deb Leister, Hanscom Representative 

Tom Sander, Vice Chair 

Al Schmertzler 

Jennifer Glass, Chair 

The 2009-2010 school year was one in which our students continued to learn 
and grow in a high quality pre-kindergarten through grade eight school system. 
They demonstrated their knowledge and newly developed skills through their 
classroom work, on the stage in musical and theatrical performances, on the 
athletic fields, through participation in the middle school science and engineering 
fair, and in our community. Their learning continues to be guided and supported 
by a caring and professional combination of teachers, tutors, assistants, and 
administrators. We also appreciate the contributions of the staff who support 
instruction: our custodians, food service staff, technology team, and office staff. 
Finally, our school community is strengthened by the parent and community 
volunteers who, through their many and varied efforts, provide the support 
needed to maintain a quality education. 

The School Committee and Administration continued efforts to realize the 
district's strategic goals in the areas of (1) curriculum, instruction and 
assessment, (2) teacher excellence and professional development, (3) 
leadership and school culture, and (4) facilities, operations, health and safety. 
Because of the generous resources provided to our schools by the Lincoln 
community and through our contract with the federal government to operate the 
schools at Hanscom Air Force Base, we have been able to both support existing 
programs and introduce improvement initiatives. 

Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: We continued the successful 
implementation of a new elementary mathematics program for grades K through 
5, and began the implementation of a new mathematics program in grades 6 
through 8. Responding to student need and in preparation for challenging high 
school classes, we offered an advanced algebra class to 25 grade 8 students. 
To extend math learning beyond the classroom, a summer "math camp" was 
offered to Lincoln campus students entering grades 3 and 4. Children of all skill 
levels participated in project-based learning that provided both remedial support 
and skill extension. On the Hanscom campus, a Title I Summer Booster Reading 
and Math Camp was offered to students entering grades 1 through 3. 

We also extended the engineering curriculum to grades 7 and 8 in order to teach 
students about the design process. This is an exciting hands-on curriculum in 

117 



which students develop ideas using scientific knowledge along with design and 
manufacturing principles. 

In addition, faculty members and administrators continued to create district-wide 
common assessments at all grade levels. The first of these were used last year, 
providing a baseline by which to measure future growth. Classroom and 
specialist teachers engaged in a collaborative process to analyze the results. 

Goals for the 2010-2011 school year include a writing initiative to improve 
student writing in all grades and subjects, maintaining an emphasis on recently 
updated math, science and engineering curricula, expanding Spanish instruction 
to grade 3, and refining instruction to meet the needs of both struggling and 
advanced learners. 

Teacher Excellence and Professional Development: The School Committee 
remains committed to the continued learning of the faculty and staff and supports 
the district's efforts to help teachers remain current in their practice. In order to 
better support the work of classroom teachers, paraprofessionals were trained in 
the new math programs, and given additional training in literacy skills and 
behavior management. 

Professional development in Responsive Classroom ® at the elementary level, 
and Developmental Design® at the middle school level provided teachers with a 
framework designed to strengthen school culture and students' social/emotional 
skills. 

During the summer of 2010, 18 curriculum and professional development 
projects involving about 200 teachers were completed. Topics ranged from the 
launch of a K-8 writing initiative, to foreign language instruction for elementary 
school, to teacher web page design, to the use of data to inform instruction. 

Looking forward to the 2010-2011 school year, there will continue to be 
professional development in the areas of writing instruction, using data collection 
for evaluation and to inform instruction, and the effective use of technology. 
Also, the School Committee will strive to successfully negotiate a contract with 
the Lincoln Teachers Association (LTA). 

Leadership and School Culture: Building on the Middle School Conference for 
Education and Leadership for a Non-Violent Age (ELNA) in 2008, faculty from the 
district created a Community Service Learning Conference in November 2009 for 
students in grades 5 through 8 from both the Lincoln and Hanscom campuses. 
Students heard from Mike Cambra, founder of Mission to Liberia, who talked 
about how one person can make a difference. They then spent time in small 
groups with representatives of both community and national organizations such 
as the Lincoln Journal, the Food Project, and Habitat for Humanity. In January, 



118 



students from both campuses made presentations about the conference to the 
School Committee. 

Students were given opportunities for leadership when they made presentations, 
provided music, and served as announcers at the elementary school All School 
Meetings. Middle School students planned Olympic Day, an updated "field day" 
where cross-grade teams of students compete in a variety of outdoor and indoor 
events. The Student Council organized "spirit days" and planned community 
service opportunities. 

In an on-going effort to improve communication, the new Lincoln Public Schools 
website, www.lincnet.org, was launched in October of 2009. Curriculum 
expectations, School Committee reports and minutes, a calendar of events, and 
school newsletters are now available on the website. 

Looking forward, administrators, faculty, and the School Committee will work on 
anti-bullying curriculum and policies that aim to prevent bullying and address 
issues that arise. This effort will also ensure that the district is in compliance with 
the anti-bullying law signed last year by Governor Patrick. 

Facilities, Operations, Health and Safety: The Lincoln Public Schools 
successfully garnered Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA) approval 
for a feasibility study to address the needs of the Smith and Brooks buildings on 
the Lincoln campus. The funding for the study was approved at Town Meeting in 
March 2010. During the summer of 2010, the School Building Committee (SBC) 
reviewed proposals from potential "Owner's Project Managers," an essential step 
in the feasibility study process, and an OPM from the firm Skanska was hired. In 
addition, we persuaded the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) 
to replace the Hanscom Middle School in 2012. 

Other accomplishments include the re-competition of the Hartwell space resulting 
in a 5-year lease with Magic Garden pre-school, the roll-out of the NutriKids point 
of sale (POS) system for school lunches, and implementation of the 2008 Food 
Service Review recommendations. 

In the 2010-2011 school year, the SBC will continue its work, reviewing 
proposals from designers and then sending three of its members to become part 
of a 15 member MSBA panel that will conduct interviews and choose a designer 
to complete the feasibility study. All meetings of the SBC are open to the public, 
and community input will be an important part of the study process. On the 
Hanscom campus, planning for the new middle school will continue. 

Recognition: Lincoln and Hanscom students continued to demonstrate 
outstanding academic, athletic, artistic, and civic accomplishments. At the end of 
the school year we honored our graduates. Seventy-one young men and women 



119 



graduated from Lincoln School and 35 from Hanscom Middle School. We wish 
them the very best for continued success in high school and beyond. 

We also bid farewell to a number of retiring teachers last June. The School 
Committee thanks them for many years of caring, compassionate service to our 
students and wishes them well for a happy, healthy, and fruitful next phase in 
their lives. At the Lincoln School we recognized Elaine Cooney, Laurel Dimatteo, 
Norma Lucey, Kathleen Maloblocki, Lynn Wish, and Joan Yarro, and on the 
Hanscom campus we thanked Charlotte Berger, Claire Groden, Phyllis Groskin, 
and Maureen Mar. 

New School Committee Members: At the Town Elections in March 2010 Tom 
Sander was re-elected to the School Committee, and Tim Christenfeld was 
elected to fill the seat vacated by Julie Dobrow. The Committee is very grateful 
to Julie for the seven years she dedicated to the Committee and to the exemplary 
leadership she provided as Chair. In October 2010, Jen James was appointed to 
complete Rob Orgel's term after his resignation at the end of August. We thank 
Rob for his work as a Committee member. 



th 



LINCOLN SCHOOLS GRADUATES 2010 (8 in Grade) 



LINCOLN 

Avery Donald Alden 

Aubriana Unique Alves 

Ian Woodward Arthur 

Jacob Russell Barrie 

Joelle Diane Bellini 

John Douglas Bigelow 

Austin Richard Brown 

Amani Schilo Calixte 

Adam Cameron 

Olivia Lansdale O'Hagan Chatfield 

Phoebe Elizabeth O'Hagan Chatfield 

Alicia B. Collura 

Brandi LaRay Cooley 

Caroline Churchill Cort 

Nicole Marie Cummings 

Jordan Alan Day 

Nico Daniel Dionisotti 

Monica Elena Driscoll 

Jeremiah Jalille Earl English-Grant 

Amanda Glena Fasciano 

Eric Michael Fox 

Tony Gallup 

Jennifer Mary Genovese 

Caroline Evans Glass 

Sara Ann Goldstein-Weiss 



Logan Andrew Welch Hallowell 
Thomas McFarland Hamilton 
Ian David Helmus 
Verlinciea Annalyshia Heraldo 
Samuel John Higgins 
Grace Currier Holbrook 
John Conor Holway 
Douglas Hornstein 
Bradford Stephen Howard Jr. 
Consuelo Karen Hylton 
Norma Kimberlea Hylton 
Caroline Campbell Jahrling 
Kyra Justine Jones 
Emily Boardman Kelman 
Charles Edward King 
Charlotte Lyza Levasseur 
Caroline Wills Maloney 
Nicholas John Manos 
Devon Jaclynn McGinty 
Katherine A. Miano 
Helen Reid Montie 
Claire Noelle Morse 
Philipp Konstantin Nowak 
Chantel Osborne 
Vincent Frank Panetta 



120 



Paris Ryder Parks 

Tiani Rae Perkins 

Kevin Wayne Perrington-Turner 

Jonah Rader-Gale 

Randell Scot Roby 

Nicholi Vladimir Rogatkin 

Andrew Roberts Rosenblatt 

Benjamin Natan Scheff 

Leah Meyer Shorb 

Amy Elizabeth Stoddard 

Dara Judyth Storer 



Mark William Styles 
Jacob Alexander Terren 
Jeremy Evan Dobrow Vale 
Andre Constantin Vogel 
Daniel Micah Weinstein 
Suzanne Elizabeth White 
Benjamin Vincent Wilcox 
DeShaun Tyrell Wood-Smith 
Troy Yang 
Valerie Ranran Zhao 



HANSCOM 

Dawud Abdul Azeez 
Ryan M. Abele 
Victoria N. Beattie 
Ashley Michelle Best 
Mason J. Breault 
Joshua Bryant Brooks 
Kayla M. Cockrum 
Domenic D. Cook 
William F. Corey 
Randy Davis 
Jonathan Dinnell 
Felecia Eva Dozier 
Zoe R. Grayson 
Ytrenda Janae Gulley 
Bradley M. Hale 
Tia'Desha A. Harris 
Lydia Hirzel 
Kimber A. Knapp 
Joe R. Lewis 
Kiara Imani McBride 
David R. Medina 
Maiyan D. Montgomery 
Kathryn Rose Murdock 
Antoinne F. Murraine 
Matthew McDowell Nicklas 
Bailey Marie Orr 
Chyanne N. Pearce 
Jessica Phillips 
Derrick Michael Pizarro 
Ethan C. Ratliff 
Katie M. Schumaker 
Raven Keyanna Shrader 
Abigail Soto 
Chelsea Taymes 
De'Mario Williams 



121 



LINCOLN SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Superintendent's Report 

Radha Gargeya 

Kevin J. Matthews 

Patricia Mostue 

Berne Webb 

Nancy Marshall (Vice Chair) 

Mark Collins (Chair) 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School continues to provide a high quality 
education for its students. In the face of a prolonged economic slump, the high 
school's priority is the preservation of teaching positions and the school's core 
mission. Throughout the 2009-2010 school year, an administratively lean high 
school that has already taken advantage of operational efficiencies with regard to 
outsourcing (both food service and custodial labor), scrutinized its budget and 
explored collaborative efforts to be more efficient and more effective. While 
Obama-era "stimulus" money supported a few staff positions, which otherwise 
would have gone unfunded, the 2009-2010 school year budget still required 
reduction in staffing and services, compared to the prior year. Since 2001, class 
sizes and teacher loads have gradually ticked upwards, putting a strain on 
learning and teaching. To prevent further loss of staff and services and to help 
recapture some of the school's past excellence, increased taxpayer support from 
the communities was needed, but a defeated override vote in Sudbury during 
May of 2010 meant that the high school would be laying off staff for the third year 
in a row. 

The school goal for the 2009-2010 academic year was "to improve 
communication within the school and between the school and the communities 
we serve." Conveying to the community the school's successes and its 
challenges moved to the forefront. The high school improved curricular 
documents to reflect the richness and quality of the school's curriculum as part of 
the NEASC accreditation cycle. Stakeholders within and outside of the school 
were given a "seat at the table" in the decision-making process, as the size and 
functionality of the School Council increased and committees on safety and long- 
range planning were established. 

The 2009-2010 school year saw many transitions. The high school opened the 
academic year under the leadership of a new Superintendent/Principal, stepping 
into a two-year interim position. The high school adjusted to the closure of one of 
its four administrative houses - the 33% increase in student load for the 
remaining housemasters clearly surfaced as an obstacle for each housemaster in 
their ongoing efforts to make close connections to students. The high school's 
White House Preschool, which had been operating at a deficit for several years, 
was closed as renovation and rental options were explored to create a fiscally 
sustainable program in the White House building. 

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Throughout the year, Lincoln-Sudbury participated in G4, a series of discussions 
with the Wayland, Sudbury, and Lincoln Public Schools, collaboratively seeking 
efficiencies in operations. An outgrowth of this collaboration became the 
consolidation of the Lincoln-Sudbury and Sudbury Public School's METCO 
Director positions. Lincoln-Sudbury and Sudbury Public ultimately hired a shared 
Director to run the program for the combined 156 students. 

Our students continue to benefit from a rich and rigorous high school curriculum, 
excel on SAT and AP tests, and subsequently get into many of the country's best 
colleges. Extracurricular opportunities available to our high school students are 
one of the school's strengths. Our Ocean Science Bowl team advanced to the 
National Championships. Visual Arts students received State and National 
recognition for their work. The school's drama productions included "Alice in 
Wonderland" and "Up the Down Staircase." Finally, during the 2009-2010 
academic year, Lincoln-Sudbury was also the home of Massachusetts' State 
Champions for Boys' Nordic Skiing. The school also earned Dual County 
League Championships in Boys and Girls Lacrosse, Boys and Girls Volleyball, 
Boys and Girls Hockey, Boys Soccer, Baseball, and Girls Indoor Track, Cross 
Country and Tennis. 

The overall budget for Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, not including debt 
service, was $23,210,038 in FY09 and increased by 2.11% in FY10 to 
$23,700,560. The overall FY09 per pupil cost was $15,775, which is less than 
the average per pupil cost at high schools to which L-S is typically compared. In 
an economic climate allowing for minimal budget growth, L-S has continued to 
serve its students well and provides students a strong springboard for success in 
college and beyond. 



Scott Carpenter 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

Superintendent/Principal 



123 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Kemon Taschioglou, School Committee 

About Minuteman 

Minuteman is a four-year career and technical high school serving the member 
towns of: Acton, Arlington, Belmont, Bolton, Boxborough Carlisle, Concord, 
Dover, Lancaster, Lexington, Lincoln, Needham, Stow, Sudbury, Wayland, and 
Weston. Minuteman combines rigorous academics in preparation for college with 
relevant career and technical programs. The school also provides career 
development programs for adults, as part of our self-sustaining Community 
Education Program. 

Enrollment 

As of October 1 , 2010, two (2) high school students and two (2) half day students 
were enrolled at Minuteman providing a full time equivalent (FTE) of Three (3) 
residents of Lincoln. 

The fall of 2010 Minuteman experienced a 60% increase in the Freshman Class. 
New recruitment and communications strategies were executed and have 
included students, parents, alumni and advisory committee members in speaking 
to parents, interested students and community groups about the value add of a 
Minuteman education. 

Minuteman offers a unique program allowing student enrollment on a half day- 
every day basis. Currently, few Lincoln students take advantage of this design. 
Minuteman also offers 'Post Graduate' programs to Lincoln residents of any age 
who are seeking to enhance their own economic opportunity via skill 
development. Beginning in FY12 Member community Post-Graduate Students 
will be charged a partial tuition that will escalate over several fiscal years to 
reflect the estimated operating costs. 

Class of 2010 Graduate Achievement Highlights 

100% successfully passed the state-required MCAS in English and Math. 
25% of the class of 2010 earned the John and Abigail Adams Scholarships 
72% college acceptance or advanced Technical Training, 19% career bound and 
5% military. Overall, graduates achieved a 96% placement rate. 
100% of Dental graduates passed the National Dental Board examination. 
100% of Early Education and Care program completers were certified by the 
Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care. 
100% of Cosmetology graduates passed State Board examinations. 
Health Occupation graduates achieved 100% in college acceptance 
Valedictorian, Adam Strandberg, was the commencement speaker. He is a 
Biotechnology graduate from Tewksbury. At graduation, he was honored with the 
DeLuca Family Award, the Minuteman National Honor Society Award, the MPA- 
Science Technology Academic Scholar Award and was a Friends of Minuteman 

124 



Award recipient. Adam is attending Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) 
in Cambridge, MA. 

District Leadership 

In December of 2010, Middlesex County District Attorney, Gerard Leone, recognized 
Superintendent, Edward Bouquillon with the Martin Meehan Education Leadership Award 
in achieving exemplary status in regards to school safety, protection and education of its 
students. 

In January of 201 1 , the Lexington Chamber of Commerce recognized Minuteman in its 
efforts to promote Workforce and Adult education programs with the 201 1 Community 
Initiative Award. 

Financial and Asset Management 

The Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA) invited Minuteman to the Feasibility 
phase of a renovation project. As of August 15, 2010, 16 of 16 member towns approved 
the Feasibility Study request of $724,000. The first phase of the project includes the 
completion of an Enrollment Study, Strategic Plan, and a review of the Regional District 
Agreement. In late spring the district will continue the Feasibility Study to provide member 
communities with further details regarding the potential project scope to provide students 
with appropriate school resources. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

The Strategic Planning process has identified several new programs that Minuteman will 
be seeking to establish including: Criminal Justice/Bio-Security, Animal Science and 
programs within the Technical and Performing Theater Arts Cluster. Two programs were 
phased out in 2010 including Office Technology and Auto Body Repair. In 2010 a new 
program, Hospitality Management, gained Chapter 74 State Approval. A Barbering 
Program is in its second year of operation under the umbrella of the currently approved 
Cosmetology program. 

Assessment and Program Evaluation 

The New England Association of School and Colleges (NEASC) approved the Decennial 
Re-accreditation of Minuteman in November of 2009 with a concern regarding the facility. 

Teaching Faculty Recognition 

Environmental Technology teacher Emily Blume was awarded the 2010 Ocean 
Stewardship Teacher of the Year Award from the New England Aquarium. 

Social Studies teachers accepted an invitation to participate in a Teaching American 
History Grant, awarded by the U.S. Dept. of Education. Other members of the 
collaborative are Lexington, Woburn, Burlington, Bedford, and Somerville Public Schools. 



125 



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